Interesting Story of Igboho Kingdom in Oyo State

Igboho plays a significant role in the former Oyo Empire’s history. Although Oyo plays a significant role in Yoruba history,  Igboho’s  contribution to the Oyo Empire’s durability cannot be ignored or forgotten. Gbage’s departure from Ilesha marked  the beginning  of  the Igboho people. After a struggle for the chieftaincy, Gbage’s younger brother was crowned Owa. In an attempt to bring about peace, the (angry) elder brother fled the realm. Gbage Olabinukuro, the elder brother, departed  the Owa palace and established Ebiti, his own hamlet. To this new residence, he was accompanied by all of his admirers, including hunters. During that historical period, the ancient Oyo Empire was invaded by Fulani. They made Alaafin Ofinran  and his people leave  their  house. Alaafin met Gbage, who had moved from Ilesha, when he arrived in Ebiti. Alaafin Ofinran said that Gbage  was a strong,  charming man who possessed great strength when fighting or hunting. The relative  calm and tranquility of the community  astounded Alaafin Ofinran. After that, he asked who the head was—usually  referred to  as  Baale—and Gbage was  asked to  meet  with Alaafin. It was Gbage who greeted him. After Kishi, they arrived at a river (Sanya), where Alaafin’s wife gave birth to a newborn boy named Tella Abisipa, or a child born on  the route. Upon arriving to the center of Igbo-Oba, which is still known by that name today, the oracle informed them that they  would  be staying there. Two birds were battling on a tree beneath which they were all sitting when the herbalist  was performing a  divination. One of the birds was an Igbo bird (Eye Igbo), and the other was an Oyo bird (Eye Oyo). After the two birds were  slaughtered, Ifa was offered their blood as a sacrifice. The names Igbo-oyo and Igboho were derived from these two birds, Igbo and Oyo. It was alleged that Alaafin Ofinran was  interred there. Following the deaths of around four Alaafin in Igboyo,  Tella Abisipa,  who was …

Details

Idejo chiefs of Oba Adeniji Adele II Meets Queen Elizabeth II in Lagos 1956

Lagos Island’s “IDEJO” (white cap chiefs): Olofin Atekoye, the man who established Isale Eko (Lagos) and initially  made his  home  on Iddo Island, is the father of the Idejo White Cap Chiefs of Lagos. Following the demise of this fabled individual, currently recognized as the progenitor of the land-owning chiefs of  Lagos, his progeny  scattered around the city, consolidating their dominance. They would congregate for nine days in a row in Iga Idunganran, the Lagos oba’s palace, for state sessions from these locales. They conducted prayer rituals, talked about important matters, shared meals with extended family members and friends, feasted, anddanced to the sounds of the Gbedu and Igbe drums during these get-togethers. According to Lagos folklore, Idejo chiefs are descended from Olofin and were the first landowners on the island of Lagos.Certain  Idejo nobility members, like the Elegushi, have had their rank increased to that of an Oba. Olumegbon, Aromire, Oloto, Oluwa, Oniru, Onisowo, Onitolo, Elegushi, Ojoro, and Onikoyi were among Olofin’s thirty-two offspring. Idejo chiefs can be identified by their regal attire, which includes a white cap and fan. Some chiefs found homes closer to Lagos Island and the Oba’s palace due to the distances and mishaps they experienced on their way there. They were given support by the Lagos State Government to return to their various  domains and establish  themselves  as first-class monarchs during the late Oba Adeyinka Ayinde Oyekan’s reign. Title of Ojora: Formerly: Chief Ojora of Lagos Now: Oba Ojora of Ijora and Iganmu Kingdom, Coker Aguda Local Council Development Area Current Occupant: Oba Abdul Fatai Oyeyinka Aremu Aromire, Oyegbemi II Title of Oniru:…

Details

Throwback to a Picture of Abdulasalam Abubakar and Ibrahim Babangida, in their Twenties

Fifty-five years ago, a picture showed two youthful military leaders in their twenties during the 1960s:  Abdulasalam Abubakar and  Ibrahim Babangida. Babangida is currently 82 years old, and Abubakar is 81 years old. Both men are in their early 80s. Sani Abacha, their third acquaintance, would be 81 years old if he were still living. Nigeria’s military head of state,  Abubakar,  presided over the country from 1998 to 1999; Babangida did so from 1985 until his retirement in 1993.

Details

Chief Samuel Ladoke Akintola Dressed in Traditional Animal Skin for his Royal Installation as Aare Ona Kakanfo

Photo of Chief Samuel Ladoke Akintola, Premier of the Western Region, after he was installed by Alaafin Gbadegesin Ladigbolu II  of Oyo as the 13th Aare Ona Kakanfo (Military Generalissimo) of Yorubaland in 1964, after a 79-year sabbatical.  Akintola is dressed in a traditional animal leather garment, the clothing made of animal skins  represents fortitude, strength, and  power.

Details

Story of Brigadier Babafemi O. Ogundipe, A Man of Wisdom and Loyalty

Lt. Col. Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu offered Brigadier Babafemi O. Ogundipe the post of head of state in the 1960s, a  turbulent time in Nigerian history. But Brigadier Ogundipe politely turned down the offer, preferring peace and allegiance to authority. He left Nigeria for London the very following day. From January 1966 to August 1966, Babafemi Olatunde Ogundipe served as the first Chief of Staff and de facto second-in-command at Supreme Headquarters, during the military administration of Major General Johnson Aguiyi-Ironsi. During the military dictatorship of General Yakubu Gowon, he served as the Nigerian High Commissioner to the United Kingdom from September 1966 until August 1970.  On September 6, 1924, he was born to parents from Ago-Iwoye, which is now in the western Nigerian state of Ogun. In 1941, he  enlisted in the Royal West African Frontier Force, and from 1942 to 1945, he served in Burma. Following the  Second  World  War,  he reenlisted and became a brigadier in May 1964. One year after the civil war, on November 20, 1971, he passed away in London.

Details

Meet Colonel Shittu Alao, Fourth Commander of the Nigerian Air Force

From 1967 to 1969, Colonel Shittu Alao (born in 1937) led the Nigerian Air Force as its Chief of Staff. He was the second native-born  commander to occupy this role and the fourth Commander of the Nigerian Air Force (NAF). He tragically passed away in an aircraft crash in Uzebba, some 50 miles northwest of Benin, on October 15, 1969. In the plane  by  himself, he was thirty-two years old. He was buried in Lagos with full military honors two days later.From 1967 to 1969, Colonel Shittu Alao (born in 1937) led the Nigerian Air Force as its Chief of Staff. He was the second native-born commander to occupy this role and the fourth Commander of the Nigerian Air Force (NAF). He tragically passed away in an aircraft crash in Uzebba,  some 50 miles northwest  of Benin, on October 15, 1969. In the plane by himself, he was thirty-two years old. He was buried in Lagos with full military honors two days later.  

Details

Meet Fred Ajudua, Father of Davido’s Lawyer and His Involvement Wit the EFCC

Nigerian attorney Fred Chijindu Ajudua is charged with advance-fee fraud.There was no evidence at the conclusion of his case. Native of Ibusa, Fred Ajudua completed his legal studies at Edo State’s University of Benin.An item in Newswatch Magazine from  March 1994 said that I.G. Aliyu Atta, the Inspector-General of Police at the time, had called off a meeting with top cops so that he  could meet with Ajudua. Aliyu Atta attempted to  sue  the magazine for libel but was unsuccessful. He was reportedly incarcerated for five years at Kirikiri and Agodi in 2000.  The Nigerian Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) Chairman, Alhaji Nuhu Ribadu, announced in October 2003 that  Ajudua was facing twelve cases, including two cases involving advance fee fraud from 2001—one involving 1.6 million Euros and  the other involving $1.5 million. He was charged with extorting money from Canadian Nelson Allen, a $250,000 loser. It was reported that he had cost a German $350,000.Between 1999 and 2000, he was alleged to have deceived two Dutch nationals out of around $1.69 million.Frieda Springer-Beck, a German woman, consented to an out-of-court settlement on July 26,  2005,  following a protracted sequence of unproductive court appearances beginning in 1993. He was appointed to teach basic law following his incarceration and while he awaited his fraud trial. On February 3, 2005, Ajudua  was given bail to travel to India for medical treatment. On March 20, 2007, inside an Ibusa beer parlor,  the EFCC made an  attempt  to apprehend him after learning that he had returned to Nigeria. Thugs with guns stopped the move. Anyone with information that could result in the fugitive’s apprehension is encouraged to come forward by the commission.  Based on an EFCC report that claimed Ajudua’s wife had engaged in a scheme to obtain $7.85 million and $3 million under false  pretenses and had used money from fraud to campaign for election, the Administrative Panel of Inquiry on Reports of Alleged Corrupt Practices recommended in 2007 that she should not run for political office. However, the panel pointed out that there was no concrete evidence connecting her to her husband’s actions.

Details

How Far Can You Go For Love: Nigerian Man Switches His Name to Marry a Widow in 1930

Lady Oyinkansola Ajasa, also known as Lady Oyinkansola Abayomi, was born in Colonial Lagos on March 6, 1897. She was the  daughter of Sir Kitoye Ajasa, a Yoruba aristocrat who was the first Nigerian to receive a knighthood from the British, and Lucretia  Olayinka Moore, a princess of the Egba royal dynasty. She completed her education in 1909 at  the Anglican Girls’  Seminary in  Lagos. From there, go to the Gloucestershire Young Ladies Academy at Ryford Hall. She studied at the London-based Royal Academy  of  Music in 1917. In 1920, she returned to Lagos and took a job at the Anglican Girls’ Seminary as a music instructor. She met the love of her life at this time, a lawyer by the name of Mr. Moronfolu Abayomi, whom she married in 1923. When Mr. Moronfolu Abayomi was assassinated in court two months later, she was devastated and decided she would never marry  again. Dr. Kofoworola She told John that if he wanted to marry her, he would have to take her late husband’s name, Abayomi. Observe what transpired. He consented, was married to her, and adopted the name Dr. Kofoworola Abayomi. Born in Lagos on July 10, 1896, Sir Kofoworola Adekunle “Kofo” Abayomi, KBE, was of Egbe-Yoruba descent. He was a politician from Nigeria who went on to have a notable career in public service. He was one of the founders of the nationalistNigerian Youth Movement in 1934. His most recent significant position in the public eye was as the Lagos Executive Development Board’s chairman from 1958 until 1966

Details

Throwback Image of Enugu, The Coal City, Before the Civil War

The two largest petroleum firms in West Africa at the time are seen in this picture: Shell Nigeria is on the right, and Total is on the left. In 1938, Shell D’Arcy commenced operations in Nigeria after being awarded an exploration license. Oil exports began in 1958 when Shell Nigeria identified the Niger Delta’s first commercial oil field in Oloibiri in 1956. Like many other  African nations, Nigeria’s economy was heavily dependent on agricultural exports to foreign nations prior to the discovery of oil. A lot of Nigerians believed the developers were in search of palm oil. On June 1, 1956, TOTAL NIGERIA PLC was established as a private business with the purpose of marketing petroleum products in Nigeria. For over fifty years, Total Nigeria Plc has led the downstream segment of the country’s oil and gas business. In Lagos, the first Total gas station opened for business in 1956.  

Details

Picture of the Beautiful Dideolu Awolowo, Wife of Chief Obafemi Awolowo

Wife of Chief Obafemi Awolowo, Chief Hannah Idowu Dideolu Awolowo, outside Broad Street Prison in 1962. She was getting  ready  to eat her husband’s lunch inside the prison when she got out of the car. Awolowo was imprisoned in 1963 for plotting to destroy the government, but General Yakubu Gowon granted him a military amnesty  in 1966. Chief Hannah Idowu Dideolu Awolowo saw her husband every three days while he was incarcerated till his release. They remained together through thick and thin until old age thanks to their enduring romance, which started in the early 20th century. Chief Hannah Idowu Dideolu Awolowo passed away in 2015 at the age of 100.

Details

Accounts of the Death of Oba Ehengbuda During a Violent Storm on a Visit to Lagos

Ehengbuda, also called Ehengbuda N’Obo, which translates to “Ehengbuda the Physician,” was the eighteenth Oba of the Benin  Empire, ruling from around 1578 until 1606 AD. Ehengbuda, the son of Orhogbua, the first Oba to have contact with Europeans,  succeeded him in extending the empire’s borders westward and eastward and establishing dominance over vassal nations. In addition, he traded and conducted diplomacy with the Portuguese and English, earning presents like a telescope. The warrior  monarchs of Benin history came to an end when he was killed in a storm at sea while returning from a visit to his colony in Lagos.  The Obas that followed him gave their chiefs charge of the military. Ehengbuda, the eighteenth Oba of Benin, came to the throne in 1578 AD. He was the eldest son of Oba Orhogbua and Iyoba Umelu. A senior chief named Uwangue of Uselu accused him of trying to steal power while his father was away at war.His mother, Iyoba  Umelu, killed herself out of worry for her son’s safety, and his steward, Ake, were executed as a result of this accusation. Nevertheless, an additional inquiry exonerated Ehengbuda of any misconduct. Ehengbuda eliminated the title  of Uwangue of  Uselu  once he was crowned. In addition, he enacted a number of reforms, giving his chieftains and warriors new titles and levels. Most notably, he created the role of Ohennika of Idunmwu-Ebo, which is in charge of performing burial ceremonies for people who  take their own lives within Benin City. Oba Ehengbuda perished at sea in a severe storm in 1606,  while on his way back from a  visit  to Lagos. He had traveled to Lagos Island to examine the military camp (eko) that his father had built. He planned to paddle his way  back to Benin City with his chiefs and warriors. However, after about six days of voyage from Benin and two days from Lagos, an unexpected storm capsized their watercraft on the Agan River. The bodies of Ehengbuda and his companions were never found after they drowned. The period ruled by  warrior kings  came to an end with Ehengbuda’s reign. Later Obas turned their attention to the ceremonial and spiritual  aspects of kingship,  giving  their chiefs command over the armed forces. The Oba’s position inside the palace grew more and more isolated, and he began to  be seen more as a figure of mystical strength than of military might.  He increased the Benin Empire’s power and influence on a larger scale, securing its hold on many tributary territories. He acquired cutting-edge technologies and gifts while promoting commerce and diplomatic  ties with European powers. He also  arbitrated conflicts amongst Yoruba Obas, with whom he was dynastically related.Interestingly, he brought about changes in the court by giving his chiefs and warriors new titles and positions.In addition, he instituted rites and practices that are being followed today. Ehengbuda, a well-known doctor and spiritualist, was rumored to have had a glass in his  possession that allowed  him to see into  the…

Details

“OMIYALE” Major Flood Disaster in Ibadan,1980

“Omiyale,” the name of this flood, literally translates to “water has flooded the house.” The Ogunpa River spilling into the Odo-Ona  River caused the flood. Together, the two rivers spilled their banks, causing the flood. However, the August 31, 1980 flood was the event that made the Ogunpa famous both nationally and internationally. The city of  Ibadan was practically destroyed after roughly ten hours of intense rain, which was measured to be four times heavier than it was  during the flood of 1978. Over a hundred bodies were recovered from the wreckage  of toppled homes and cars  carried away  by the flood. More than 50,000 were left homeless and more than 200 people perished. Chief Bola Ige was the Oyo State governor at the time, and Alhaji Shehu Shagari was the Nigerian president. Ibadan is a vibrant metropolis. It is poorly built, has poor drainage, and has a steep  topography with a mix of  rivers and streams,  including Odo-Ona, Ogbere, Ògùnpa, and Kúdetì. Additionally, the locals disregard town planning and building codes;  they construct buildings on or near the city’s riverbanks and carelessly discard trash into these waterways.  This confluence of elements gave Ibadan’s recurring flooding its background. There have been floods in Ibadan in  1960, 1963,  1978, 1980, and 2011. The 2011 incident had an impact on the campus of Ibadan,  encompassing the campus zoo  as well, following  a flood that claimed numerous animals from the fishery and zoo. During his interview, a witness to the 1980 OMIYALE water disaster stated: I was out with my parents on the day of the Ogunpa Flood calamity, thus I will never forget it, the rain was falling  when we  got back  from our visit. My siblings were unable to return home due to the intense rain that had continued into the evening. Additionally, the Old Ife Road is unusable due to flooding caused by the Onipepeye stream in Agodi, they were unable to return home. There were no cell phones or other means of communication back then. NEPA hit, making things  worse and leaving us  without power at home. It was such a horrific event. Thankfully, nobody was harmed and made it home after the water.  When it comes to how they handled the 1980 flood calamity, three men stand out. They are Chief Ebenezer Obey,  Chief Bola Ige, and the late President Shehu Shagari.…

Details

Biography of Aare Azeez Arisekola Alao and Asset Allocation After His Death

Former Aare Musulumi of Yorubaland, Edo, and Delta, Aare Arisekola Alao was a well-known philanthropist  and public person who  was well-known for his substantial economic endeavors and contributions to the Muslim community. Following his death, there was a great deal of curiosity and conjecture about the division and administration of his vast holdings. Aare Arisekola Alao was the son of Alhaji Abdur Raheem Olatunbosun Olaniyan Alao and Alhaja Rabiatu Olatutu Abegbe Alao of Ajia in the Ona Ara Local Government Area of Oyo State. He was born on Valentine’s Day, February 14, 1945. He attended St.  Luke’s  School in Adigun for his primary schooling, and then ICC Primary School in Igosun, both in Ibadan. At first, Alao was happy with the Islamic education he began at the age of three and had no interest in pursuing a Western education. But in the end, he decided to pursue formal education thanks to Mr. J.O. Oladejo, a teacher, who persuaded him repeatedly. He took the entrance exams for two prestigious schools, Lagelu Grammar School in Ibadan and Christ School in Ado-Ekiti, after  completing his primary schooling in 1960. He placed third in the race for admission to  Lagelu Grammar  School despite being  the  top applicant in the Christ School exam. But even with his intelligence, he was unable to continue his western education because of his parents’ low income—peasant  farmers. However, his solid Islamic education and unwavering determination made up for his lack of a western education. Encouraged to pursue a better life, Alao entered the corporate world with commendable traits including cunning, assertiveness,  truthfulness, aggressiveness, and a strong will to achieve. Before going it alone in 1961 and  starting to sell  Gammalin 20,  he briefly worked as an apprentice at Gbagi Market in Ibadan under his uncle. A cunning businessman, he was  about to join Imperial  Chemical Industries as an agent. He didn’t even have to start his firm before he was well-known in his community and the former Western Region. He expanded  his company and made extensive connections in politics and religion using the platform. In 1980, the Muslim Ulamah  in Yoruba  land bestowed upon him the title of Aare Musulumi of Yorubaland due to his commitment in and support of religious matters. Alao was a detrabilized Nigerian who welcomed individuals from all racial and religious backgrounds. Always encouraging of others’ aspirations, Alao helped others realize their dreams by founding the Pa Raheem Alao Scholarship  Foundation to benefit underprivileged university students. This was done in spite of the fact that his own desire of receiving a western education was dashed.  He was one of the principal backers and co-founder of Barakat International School, which is located in Bodija. He also held  endowments in several private universities throughout the nation. A famous industrialist, he founded a plethora of  companies under  the Lister conglomerate that included publishing, real estate management, insurance, food production, and transportation. He  engaged several people whose salaries he paid on a regular basis to build the Abdul Azeez Arisekola Central Mosque on Iwo Road  in Ibadan. In addition, three Islamic professors were employed by the mosque. Alao funded the Muslim …

Details

Read SBJ Oshofa Prophetic Revelation to Obasanjo on Presidential Ambition

A 1970s picture of SBJ Oshofa and a youthful General Olusegun Obasanjo. SBJ Oshofa and his group, the BOT, visited the  presidential villa in Ikoyi, Lagos, while Chief Olusegun Aremu Obasanjo was the president of Nigeria. In the late 1970s,  Chief  Olusegun Obasanjo and Pa SBJ Oshofa were pictured in this photo. Following their chat, Papa Oshofa gave millions of Naira to help Nigeria recover from a recession. According to historical accounts, SBJ Oshofa conveyed to Obasanjo a spiritual message in which he foretold of his eventual return to lead the nation once more. Although Obasanjo first disregarded this prophecy, it ultimately came to pass.

Details

Must-Read: Story of French-German Legionnaire Rolf Steiner and His Involvement in the Nigerian Civil War.

He was 35 years old when he commanded the 4th Commando Brigade in the Biafran Army, as seen in the photos. As a lieutenant-colonel, history claims that the first three brigades never existed; the Biafran command headquarters spread this false information to mislead the Nigerian Federal Forces. For the majority of 1968, Steiner’s opponent was 3rd Nigerian Marine Commando Division’s “Black Scorpion” Adekunle. During the battle, Steiner got into a physical altercation with Col. Odumegwu Ojukwu. The story will disclose all the specifics of what happened. Steiner chose the skull and crossbones as his regimental emblem because he believed it would serve as a constant reminder tohis soldiers of the dangers associated with war. He discovered that the Biafran people were very driven and quick learners. Instead of being a mercenary, Steiner became a citizen of the Biafran people and fought for them unpaid all the way to the end of the war—long after the majority of other European soldiers of fortune had deserted. The majority of the other commanders had trained in conventional warfare at Sandhurst, but Steiner’s guerilla warfare skills aided the Biafran cause far more. DETAILS OF THE STORY  He got in touch with his old colleague Roger Faulques, who was setting up a mercenary force for the newly independent Republic of Biafra, in 1967 while residing in Paris.  Biafra, which controlled a large portion of Nigeria’s oil reserves and could produce one million barrels of oil per day, was backed by France. Biafra was estimated to have oil reserves in 1967 that were roughly one-third that of Kuwait. Charles de Gaulle, the president of France, thought that by supporting Biafra’s separation from Nigeria, the French oil companies would be granted permission to extract Biafra’s oil. Note: The United Kingdom Soviet Union also provided support to the Nigerian Army. Steiner was one of the mercenaries hired by the French secret service, the Service de Documentation Extérieure et de Contre-Espionnage, to fight for Biafra. Declassified French documents in 2017 verified long-held suspicions: the “Africa cell” led by controversial French civil servant Jacques Foccart within the French government was responsible for arming and recruiting mercenaries like Steiner to fight for Biafra. Once French weapons were transported in from Libreville, Gabon, Uli’s airfield earned the title of “Africa’s busiest airport.” Biafra was recognized by Gabon, a former French colony and member of France, per French directives. French weaponry was transported by air to Uli from Libreville. Aside from France, South Africa was the primary foreign backer of Biafra because the apartheid regime desired the collapse of oil-rich Nigeria, which was thought to be the black African nation most likely to oppose South African authority. Furthermore, from a South African perspective, the continuation of the Nigerian Civil War was beneficial since apartheid supporters in North America and Europe utilized it as evidence that Black people were incapable of governing themselves. Steiner joined the Biafran army and flew to Port Harcourt via Lisbon, Portugal, and Libreville. Regardless of whether…

Details