Alhaji Adelabu a.k.a Penkelemesi Dies in a Car Crash with Two Others

Alhaji Adelabu passed away suddenly, and the Minister of Finance, Chief Festus Okotie-Eboh, made the announcement in Lagos. Became known as “The Lion of the West” Adegoke Gbadamosi Adelabu, also known as “Penkelemesi” or “Peculiar Mess” and “Lion of the West,” lived from 1915 to 1958. Politician, writer, and orator. He was raised in Oke-Oluokun, Ibadan, and went to the esteemed Government College Ibadan (GCI) in addition to the CMS Schools in Kudeti and Mapo. He had an unmatched academic record at GCI, one that was exceptional. He completed his studies at Yaba Higher College quickly as well. He became the first African manager when he joined the UAC after graduating. He and Adisa Akintoye co-founded the Ibadan Peoples Party in 1951. He was a fearless, powerful, and charismatic politician. Later on, he joined Zik’s NCNC and rose to the position of Leader of the Opposition in the Assembly for the Western Region. He passed away tragically on Tuesday, March 25, 1958, in an accident involving his Oldsmobile Rocket on the Lagos-Ibadan Road. At the young age of 42, he had 12 wives and 15 children.  

Details

Contribution of the Egbaland (Abeokuta) to the WWII

The Alake’s support and excellent governance contributed significantly to the Abeokuta war effort. The army was urged Egba Sons to enlist. Dances were arranged by Abeokuta, and the money raised was sent to London. For allied use, the Egba were able to purchase a spitfire known as “Abeokuta.” The rubber and palm kernels produced by Egba farmers were vital to the war effort. Rubber was needed for tanks, guns, airplanes and tires; kernel oil was needed for high explosives for the army and navy bombs for the Royal Air Force. A Southeast Asia Contingent Troops Reception committee was established in Abeokuta following the war to receive and rehabilitate the troops of Egba descent. King VI of England appointed the Alake, who was already a Commander of the British Empire (CBE), a Companion of the Orderof St. Michael and St. George, possibly as a thank you for his war effort. Photograph by E. H. Duckworth (1894–1972) and Herskovits Library of African Studies.  Image info: Standing at the Itoro Hall in Ijebu Ode are HRM, Oba Sir Ladapo Ademola II KBE, and other individuals. The photo was taken in 1941 at the Oba’s Conference in Ljebu Ode.

Details

Portuguese and European Invasion of the Benin Kingdom

The Portuguese, who visited Benin, which they called Beny, were the first Europeans to do so between the years of 1472 and 1486 AD, when King Ozolua was in power. The Portuguese acknowledged discovering a highly advanced kingdom with an extremely sophisticated system. This trip… The Portuguese, who visited Benin, which they called Beny, were the first Europeans to do so between the years of 1472 and 1486 AD, when King Ozolua was in power. The Portuguese acknowledged discovering a highly advanced kingdom with an extremely sophisticated system. Following this visit and the ensuing correspondence, King John II of Portugal, who ruled from 1481 to 1495, corresponded with the King of Benin on an equal footing. The Portuguese forged diplomatic and commercial ties with Oba Esigie and the Benin Kingdom between 1504 and 1550 AD. When the Oba sent an ambassador to Lisbon in the sixteenth century, the Portuguese king responded by dispatching missionaries to spread the gospel among the Binis. In 1 553, the English made their first call. This visit was a sign of things to come, that is England and Benin would soon establish a substantial trade relationship. Bini was dubbed Great Benin by British anthropologist and curator Henry Ling Roth. In the 16th and 17th centuries, other European travelers to Benin brought back stories of the “Great Benin,” an amazing city with opulent architecture and a well-functioning government. The state developed an advanced artistic culture and wrought with unequalled mastery works of arts in bronze, iron and ivory. The state produced works of art in bronze, iron, and ivory with unparalleled skill and developed a sophisticated artistic culture. They carved representations of historical events that they thought were important.…

Details

Reign of Oba Aiguobasinwin Eweka II Post Benin Punitive Expedition

Oba Aiguobasinwin Eweka II’s reign was a period of significant changes in the Benin Kingdom. He navigated the challenges of colonial rule and worked to preserve and protect the traditions and cultural heritage of his people. Despite the limitations imposed by British colonial authorities, he managed to maintain the essence of the kingdom’s monarchy and its traditional governance structure. He is remembered for his efforts to revive and promote traditional arts, crafts, and festivals in Benin. Under his reign, certain aspects of Benin’s cultural identity were revived and celebrated, contributing to the preservation of the kingdom’s unique heritage. Overall, Oba Aiguobasinwin Eweka II’s reign demonstrates the Benin people’s tenacity and resolve to maintain their cultural identity and customs in the face of colonial influence. He was a key figure in Benin’s history during a period of substantial change and outside pressures.

Details

Col. Francis Adekunle Fajuyi, an Unsung Hero and Profound Loyalist

In a coup that will go down in history as the bloodiest in the country,  Fajuyi paid the ultimate price for refusing to back down in defense of his boss, Gen. Aguyi Ironsi, even though the coupists did not really have him as their target. Even when it came to the last moment, his allegiance to his boss was certain. His body was to be found later, along with the bullet-riddled body of Aguyi Ironsi. A wonderful man and real hero was Col. Adekunle Fajuyi. Col. Adekunle Fajuyi’s bravery and loyalty will go down in history as rare examples of such courage and loyalty. MC BEM Francis Adekunle Fajuyi (June 26, 1926 – July 29, 1966).  Fajuyi of Ado Ekiti, who was a teacher and clerk before enlisting in the army in 1943, received the British Empire Medal in 1951 for his role in quelling a mutiny in his unit over food rations while serving as a sergeant in the Nigeria Signal Squadron of the Royal West African Frontier Force. Before the first coup in January 1966, Fajuyi was assigned to Abeokuta as garrison commander, making him the first indigenous commander of the 1st battalion in Enugu. On January 17, 1966, Major General Ironsi took over as the new C-in-C, and he named Fajuyi the Western Region’s first military governor. Along with General Johnson Aguiyi-Ironsi, the Head of State and Supreme Commander of the Armed Forces of the Federal Republic of Nigeria, who had come to Ibadan on July 28, 1966, to speak at a conference of Western Nigeria’s natural rulers, he was assassinated on July 29, 1966, in Ibadan by the retaliation-seeking counter-coupists led by Major T. Y. Danjuma. Six months prior, the civilian regime of Prime Minister Sir Tafawa Balewa was brutally overthrown, resulting in the deaths of the prime minister and several high-ranking government officials, many of whom were from northern Nigeria.

Details

Origin of Fela’s Music Career and Establishment of his Music Band

Young Fela Kuti at Trinity College of Music in London in the late 1950s, in the College Blazer. Trinity College, one of the oldest and most esteemed music schools in the world, was established in 1872. After his parents sent him to London to study medicine, Fela arrived in 1958 to study composition and trumpet performance at Trinity College of Music, which is now known as Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance. His band Koola Lobitos, which invented the modern Afrobeat musical genre, was formed while he was a student. James Brown, Miles Davis, Frank Sinatra, Yoruba traditional music, and Ghanaian and Nigerian “highlife” culture were among the influences on his music. As a result, Koola Lobitos became a mainstay of the London music scene. Following Fela’s return to Nigeria in 1969, Koola Lobitos underwent several identities, including Nigeria ’70, Afrika ’70, Egypt ’70, and Egypt ’80. While on tour in the United States in 1969, he became aware of the Black Power movement, which had a significant impact on his music and caused his songs to address social and political issues.

Details

Madam Hannah Afálà, Mother of Samuel Ajàyi Crowther

Aláafin Abiodun Adegorolu was the successor to Aláafin Ajabo, a strong monarch at the time. A girl named Osu was born to Aláafin  Abiodun. She grew up to become the mother of Olámínigbin, who married Omo-oga-egun. Together, they had a child named  Ibisomi Telerinmasa. As the princess or priestess of the great god Obatala (the god of white cloth), Telerinmasa was said to possess a unique dignity that was recognized by her people as “Afala” (the one who loves purity or the pure one). It is said that the province of Obatálá is a domain of perfect and brilliant purity. Afala wed an Edu clan member whose name was also given as Ajayi; his grandfather was the Baale of Awaiye-petu, who moved from Ketou Dahomey (now in the Benin Republic) to the Oyó empire. After the Fulani slave traders invaded their town, Oshogun, near Isheyin, in approximately 1821, Afala parted ways with her handsome son when he was just 12 years old. As a devoted mother, she eagerly anticipated the day she would undoubtedly see her son once more. Slavery had kept them apart for decades, but during Ajàyi’s missionary journey in Abéökúta, they were eventually reunited. On February 5, 1848, in Abeokuta, Madam Afala was given the name Hannah and subsequently baptized by her own son. In Abeokuta, Madam Hannah and a few other family members moved in with the bishop, where she lived to be over a century old.  

Details

The Unique Terracotta Work of Art from Ilé Ifè

Regarded as some of the most advanced works of art in the world at the time. Over time, the true historical account surrounding these outstanding pieces of art has assumed various forms. If the terracotta figures from Ilé Ifè are any indication, civilization there began a very long time ago. During his 1930 visit to the Iwinrin Groove, Wilfrid D. Hambly, the first curator of African ethnology at the Field Museum of National History in Chicago, was guided along a narrow path to see a scared ceremony and the unveiling of the sacred terracotta. The sculptures were initially protected from theft at the shrine by being hidden beneath clay pots; later, they were kept in a padlocked box in a specially made mud building in the groove. The artwork was brought to the Palace in 1934 by HRM, Oba Adesoji Aderemi, the Ooni of Ilé ife, for safekeeping until they could be moved to the National Museum of Ife Antiquities. Image 1: In Iwinrin Groove in Ilé ifè in 1930, a priest opens a box containing holy terracotta heads. Image 2: In 1931, terracotta heads were found in Iwinrin Groove at Ile Ife.    

Details

Brief Background of Obi Okosi of Onitsha

Obi Okosi was a king who was not just descended from nationalists. He discovered an African leader in Nigeria, and he perceived Africa as a powerful force in resolving global issues. He devoted his life to achieving internal harmony, peace, and security because he felt that “charity begins at home.” Thus, King Okosi of Onitsha labored nonstop and in silence to foster respect, understanding, and unity among all the tribes that were under his sphere of influence. His goal both inside and outside the Palace was to unite all different viewpoints in order to advance a cause of peace and unity beyond his own borders in this nation and, in the end, to take all of Africa with her into the front ranks of global powers by blending all of Nigeria into a single understanding. Among all his forebears, Obi Okosi lived to witness a united Onitsha, a place where all tribes coexisted as one, sharing one another’s problems and struggles through mutual understanding. He was a kind and endearing king. Image info: Queen Elizabeth Il, Obi Okosi of Onitsha, Dr. Nnamdi Azikiwe, and Prince Philip discussing at a reception in Enugu.  

Details

What are Your Thoughts on the Modern and Ancient Style of Baby Carriage Method?

The long-standing custom of carrying babies is progressively dwindling. Mothers of the more recent generations, particularly the young and well-educated ones, prefer to wear their babies rather than carry them. On the other hand, elderly mothers frequently condemn these women, arguing that the fad is merely “fashion” and not something to be supported. Warmth and the promotion of mother-child bonding are two benefits of backing, particularly for premature infants. The way kangaroos carry their young in pouches has given rise to a phenomenon known as the “kangaroo phenomenon.” In medicine, this type of system is used to assist the infant in producing warmth, particularly in cases of premature birth. In addition to fostering the mother-child bond, it provides the warmth that a baby needs to live a healthy life.

Details

Comprehensive Details of the Life and Death of Queen Amina and her Influence on Modern Feminism

The legendary Queen Amina was referred to as the fierce warrior queen in Kaduna State, particularly in Zaria, the old Kingdom of  Zazzau. Thus, Amina, daughter of Nikatau, is still honored today in traditional Hausa praise songs as “A woman as capable as a man that was able to lead men to war,” due to her involvement in leading men to fight in Zaria, particularly during the 15th and 16th centuries. King Nikatau, the 22nd king of Zazzau, and Queen Bakwa Turunku (reigned 1536–c. 1566) welcomed young Amina into the world in the middle of the sixteenth century CE. Early in the 20th century, the British gave the present-day city of Zaria (Kaduna State) its nickname in honor of her younger sister, Zaria. According to history, Amina was her grandfather’s favorite and grew up in his court. He carried her and gave her detailed military and political orders while he was in court. As a result, when Amina turned sixteen, she was given forty female slaves and given the title of Magajiya, or heir apparent (kuyanga). Many men have wooed Amina since she was a small child. After Amina’s parents died in or around 1566, her brother eventually took the crown of Zazzau. Amina had made a name for herself in the military and was now regarded as a “leading fighter in her brother’s cavalry.” After her brother Karami passed away in 1576, Amina became the first female queen.  But Daura, Kano, Gobir, Katsina, Rano, and Garun Gabas were the other six initial Hausa states (Hausa Bakwai). Zazzau was one of these prehistoric states as a result. Before Amina came to the throne,  Zazzau was one of these largest states. It also provided Arab dealers with the majority of their slave supply for the slave markets in Katsina and Kano. Three months after becoming queen, Amina began a 34-year battle with her neighbors in an attempt to expand  Zazzau  territory.…

Details

African Originated Religions Practiced in Foreign Countries

The African diasporic religion known as Candomblé originated in the sixteenth century and spread to Brazil in the nineteenth. It emerged from a process of syncretism amongst numerous West African traditional faiths, including the Gbe, Yoruba, and Bantu. A small amount of Roman Catholic Christianity has influenced this. Candomblé is based on autonomous terreiros (houses), with no central authority in charge. Because Brazilians love to dance, music and dance play a significant role in Candomblé rituals.  The term Candomblé literally means “dance in honor of the gods.” The African diasporic religion known as Santería, or Regla de Ocha, originated in Cuba in the late 1800s. It developed as a result of a process of syncretism including Spiritism, the Catholic branch of Christianity, and the traditional Yoruba religion of West Africa. Santería is not governed by a single body, and its practitioners—known as creyentes—are highly diverse. Santería is practiced in the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Cuba, and other Caribbean nations. Even though Candomblé is popular in Brazil. Santería professes the existence of an all-encompassing deity called  Olodumare  or  Olorun. Adherents hold that although this divinity is indifferent to human issues, it created the universe.  Since this creator deity is not reachable by humans, there aren’t any significant offerings made to it.This deity shares similarities with the Christian Trinity; Olodumare symbolizes the divine essence of everything that exists, while Olorun is thought to be the creator of all beings. These two aspects of the divinity are understood slightly differently. Worship deities (ORIŚAS) in Candomblé and Santería: OLODUMARE (GOD) ORUNMILA (the ORISHA of Wisdom&Knowledge) IFA OLOKUN (Oracle) IYE MAJA (Mermaid) OSHUN (River Goddess) OBATALA (The creator) OGUN (god of iron) SHANGO (god of Thunder) ÒYA (river…

Details

The Gelede Festival: A Divination Festival for Fertility

The Yoruba Gźlẹdẹ spectacle is a mask-based art and ritual dance performance that is intended to entertain, instruct, and encourage worship.  It is performed in public. Gelede honors “Mothers” (awon iya wa), a category that comprises senior women in the community, female ancestors, and deities, as well as the strength and spiritual aptitude these women possess in society. concentrating on appropriate social behavior in Yoruba society in addition to fertility and parenting. Three potential locations—Old Oyo, Ketu, and Ilobi—are associated with the historical beginnings. One of the most ornate and ancient Gelede performances, Ketu, tells the tale of a dying monarch and his twin sons fighting for the crown. One brother devised a scheme to murder his twin after realizing he would not get the crown. The brother devised a counterplan after learning of the scheme, which included building a mask and a fake person to serve as a decoy. The mythological beginnings are closely related to Iya Nla, the Great Mother, and her association with twins and maternity. The divination stories known as Odu Ifa contain the majority of Yoruba tales. There is roughly 256 Odu Ifa, and each one has several poetries known as ese Ifa. An ese Ifa typically tells the story of an animal or person with a problem and the methods taken to solve it. The story of Gelede’s beginnings is told by an ese Ifa, who describes Yemoja as “The Mother of all the orisa and all living things.” When Yemoja was unable to conceive, she went to an Ifa oracle for advice. The oracle suggested that Yemoja dance while wearing metal anklets on her feet and wooden pictures on her head. This ceremony worked, and she got pregnant. The boy who was her firstborn was called “Efe” (the humorist); the Efe mask draws attention to songs and jokes due to the character of its namesake. The daughter who was Yemoja’s second kid was called “Gelede” since she shared her mother’s obesity. Gelede cherished dancing, much like her mother did.  Neither Gelede nor Efe’s partner could have children after getting married to each other. The Ifa oracle advised them to attempt the same rite that their mother had found success with. Efe and Gelede began bearing children as soon as they carried out these rites, which included dancing while wearing metal anklets and wooden representations on their heads. The Gelede masked dance originated from these rites and was carried on by Efe and Gelede’s descendants. The Gelede  festival  is a fertility-focused…

Details

Story of Abiodun Egunjobi (Abbey Godogodo), One of Nigeria’s Deadliest Armed Robber

Big crimes have been suffered and overcome in Nigeria. The 1970s saw Oyenusi, the 1980s saw Anini, and the 1990s saw Shina Rambo. Their atrocities lasted no more than five years, according to Derico Nawa mama in the early 2000s. But one of the largest and longest periods of terror in Nigerian history was the reign of Abbey Godogodo in the early 2000s. Abiodun Egunjobi, also known as Godogodo, 36, emerged as the leader of a group that terrorized Lagos and the southwest with reckless abandon. The gang defied all logic, struck with accuracy, and killed without compassion. Godogodo, who had served seven years in prison for a crime he believed to be insignificant, set off on his journey into the dangerous world of crime. He was a junk trader in the Abule-Egba slum of Gatankowa when he got into a brawl and was taken into custody by the police. Godogodo was put in jail because he had no one to save him, him, and he felt that the police had wronged him by sending him there. He made friends with more dangerous armed robbers while incarcerated, formed an alliance with them, and spent time learning under their tutelage. Upon his release from prison, he resolved to take legal action against the police for their seven-year incarceration of him.  Godogodo, also referred to as the one-eyed assassin, caused the Lagos State Police Command so many headaches during the course of 14 years prior to his arrest on August 1, 2013, that the command rejoiced on the day of his arrest, knowing that at least its men would be safe from his guns. Godogodo, a ‘hefty man’ who was born in 1977 in Atan, Ogun State, turned to crime after he ran away from his parents’ house to live in the slum of Gatankowa in the Abule-Egba neighborhood of Lagos. In order to survive, he sold cigarettes and booze here. Later, he would run into a group of criminals who had a bag of firearms with them.  “I was co-opted into the gang, but I wasn’t satisfied with what they were giving me after each operation, so I joined another …

Details

Story of Austrian Lady, Susanne Wenger and her Influence in Osogbo, Osun State

Adunni Olorisha Susanne Wenger (left) and Ajagemo (right), a high priest of Obatala in Ede, Osun; Obatala is the father of all orishas and all humankind. She contracted tuberculosis within a year of her arrival from Austria, which led to a spiritual awakening and her conversion to the Yoruba religion. She met Ajagemo, an Obatala priest, at Ede and was drawn to the religion. Wenger was first exposed to the Yoruba language, religion, and way of life by Ajagemo, and the two quickly grew close. Wenger experimented with vibrant designs inspired by Adire manufacturing methods during this time. In the end, Wenger and Beier got divorced. Wenger then wed a local drummer named Lasisi Ayansola Onilu, and by then, she was making a name for herself as a leading figure in the Orisha faith rebirth. After leaving Ede and relocating to Ilobu, Wenger settled in Osogbo in 1961 and rose to prominence as an advocate for the Osun Grove. She performed community service by working with the Public Works Department and an artist collective to destroy termites and rebuild the shrine’s buildings and carvings using cement and wood. She became the protector of the Sacred Grove of the Osun goddess on the banks of the Osun River in Oshogbo and founded the archaic-modern art school “New Sacred Art,” which was a branch of the larger Oshogbo school. In addition to expressing the actions and purposes of the particular orishas, Wenger’s artwork also portrays the social lives of both traditional religion devotees and non-adherents. Her home serves as a gallery for her artwork because so much of the furniture inside features motifs from Yoruba art. At the age of ninety-three, Susanne passed away at her Òṣogbo residence on January 12, 2009.

Details