Queen Elizabeth II Witnesses the IJELE Masquerade in Its Full Glory

The Igbo people have been participating in the IJELE masquerade since ancient times, and it is regarded as the largest masquerade in Sub-Saharan Africa (Anambra).  One of the smaller satellite power plants constructed in Nigeria’s southeast prior to the country’s 1960 declaration of independence and the opening of the massive National Hydroelectricity Power Plant at Kainji Dam/Jebba Dam is the Oji River Thermal Power Station in Oji River, Enugu State. It was constructed with a 10 MW electrical production capacity. With the help of the nearby river and coal that is brought 50 kilometers away via overhead cable buckets from the Enugu coal site. The thermal power plant was upgraded to 30 MW following the Nigeria-Biafra civil war, providing electricity to the surrounding area as well as certain areas of Udi, Achi. 28 January 1956: During her three-week tour to Nigeria, Queen Elizabeth II saw the recently constructed power station at Oji River in East Nigeria as well as a leper settlement. The last known electricity output from the facility was in 2004. The Nigerian government has discussed proposals to reopen the plant in light of the closed coal mines in Enugu City and the plant’ssignificantly decreased water level, which prevents it from turning its turbines into an electricity-generating machine. Image info: A photo taken in 1956 during the young queen’s Commonwealth Tour of Nigeria showing her inspecting a colorful ten-foot IJELE masquerade and witnessing a leper settlement at Oji River, Enugu.  

Details

Veteran Movie Producer, Eddie Ugbomah Uncovers a Can of Worms in the Nigerian Political Space

After Ishola Oyenusi was executed in the early 1970s, Nigerian movie makers wanted to make a movie about him titled “Oyenusi.”  But they were scared to do it because it was a risky topic. This fear lasted long that even in 1977, the veteran movie director, Eddie Ugbomah, called for actors to play the role of Oyenusi in a movie he was about to produce titled “The Rise and Fall of Dr. Oyenus”, but no actor was brave enough to step forward to play the role. They all feared that yenusi’s boys might give them some trouble and hard times.  However, the courageous Eddie Ugbomah was forced to assume the role of Oyenusi. Producer Eddie Ugbomah In the movie, he revealed the secrets of top Nigerian officials and military men backing Oyenusi and his gang by providing them money and weapons. As expected, Eddie Ugbomah was intimidated and eventually, his store was ransacked. He was told in a letter to stop shooting the movie and everything would be returned to him. But Eddie Ugbomah proved not to be a coward by eventually releasing the movie in 1977. Eddie Ugbomah was a Nigerian film director and producer who lived from 19 December 1940 to 11 May 2019. He produced and directed movies like Apalara, which is about the life and murder of Alfa Apalara in Oko Awo, Lagos, The Mask, The Boy is Good, and The Rise and Fall of Oyenusi, which was released in 1979. A few of his films have plots that are partially inspired by actual events.

Details

Notorious Fraudster, Hope Olusegun Aroke and How he Pulled off another $100,000 Scam in Jail

It is difficult to forget the years 2010–2012, when songs were written about internet fraudsters, giving them the status of socialites. One significant song that set “HOPE” back was the 2012 popular song “2 Mush,” performed by an Indigenous Nigerian rapper, in which he shouted praises to his “waya waya” supporters. He became well-known throughout the nation among young hustlers thanks to this song. Who among us could forget these lines from the song? – “H-Money Oracle is a great tool.” (In other words, H-Money, a shrewd magical Oracle with numerous links.) Hope Olusegun Aroke, a Malaysian undergraduate at Kuala Lumpur Metropolitan University, was the individual known as H-Money in the song. After being apprehended by the EFCC, he was sentenced to 24 years in prison. After participating in a transaction that brought him a total of N25,000,000 (four thousand riaait), Hope was apprehended by the anti-corruption agency in 2012. The ruling was presided over by Lagos State High Court Judge Lateefa Okunnu,  who was seated in Ikeja. Hope was charged with two counts of money laundering, wire fraud, forgery, and collecting money under false pretenses when she appeared before Justice Okunnu. He was found guilty of both crimes by the court, and he received a twelve-year prison sentence for each of them. Hope’s problems began when an unidentified petitioner claimed in a letter to the EFCC that the undergraduate from Kogi state had engaged in a number of online fraud schemes. The EFCC leapt into action and looked into Aroke’s online activities. According to a different narrative, he had an affair with a lawyer’s wife while he was living in Lekki, and the woman later filed a complaint against him with the EFCC. According to investigations, he fell for multiple romantic scams, which cost him 4,000  riaait  (Malaysian currency). Aroke acknowledged sending the funds to Nigeria via a woman named Angela, who subsequently assisted him in depositing the identical amount of N25,000,000 (twenty-five million Naira) in a bank of the new generation. Two exotic cars worth N23,000,000 (twenty-three million naira) were found on him when he was apprehended.…

Details

Must Read: Margaret Ekhoe-Idahosa, Wife of Late Benson Idahosa Advice for Young Ladies on Marriage

Since her husband, Archbishop Benson Idahosa, passed away, she has been as the leader of Church of God Missions International, Inc. Having witnessed it all, she told her husband Idahosa about her wedding day and gave advice to young ladies on what not to do before getting married. In order to prevent the new ladies, our girls, from saying, “I won’t get married until I have this, until I have that,” I need to clarify something with you about the day we got married. We took a loan of our car on the day of our wedding. We were driven to the church and back to the reception by our car. My spouse stole the automobile when the owner informed him, he had somewhere to go before the reception ended. After that, we had our reception outside one of the in-laws’ homes. The father-in-law informed his wife, “Listen, I don’t want to meet any crowd at the front of my house,” as he was returning from Lagos. When it was time for us to head home, there was no car because we had hurried things along. Before we reached our house, we had to pass about eight houses, so my husband had to carry my veil while I had to tiptoe. She described how she and her husband hiked or walked to the house as my husband held my veil. Why am I stating this? I’m posting this to help our young females understand that not everything is required. Though it wasn’t a possibility back then, I could simply arrange for a limousine to transport me to church if I wanted one now. You see, your future is full of greatness, power, and promise, so don’t allow your current circumstances dictate it. Therefore, don’t let your current situation discourage you or impair your ability to bounce back from setbacks.

Details

Mighty Warlords from the 19th Century Kiriji War

Mighty warlords are seen in a historical photo from the 1877 (19th century) KIRIJI War, also known as the Ekiti Parapo War. Olugbosun of Oye, Fabunmi of Oke Imesi Ekiti, Ogedengbe of Ijesha land, Aruta of Ijesha land, Faboro of Iddo Ekiti, and the flute player Afunpe are all seen in this photo. From 1877 to 1893, the Yoruba people in Western Nigeria engaged in the longest tribal conflict in modern history. The 16-year  Kiriji War, also known as the Ekiti-Parapo War, was mostly fought between Ibadan and the combined troops of Ekiti and Ijesha. In Yoruba country, it was the war that put an end to all wars. “Kiriji” was the onomatopoeic term for the conflict, derived from the booming sound of the cannons that Ogedengbe’s Ekitis and  Ijeshas, commanding over the Ibadan soldiers, purchased in large quantities. But it came to a standstill. As a result, the Kiriji War continues to be the longest civil war in history involving any West African ethnic group. The tribes of South-Western Nigeria are, in fact, the only race in contemporary history to have fought one another in civil wars for 73 years (1820–1893) and to have survived the ordeal to remain a single tribe.

Details

Details of the Bloodiest Cult Clash in OAU Campus in 1999

The Obafemi Awolowo University in Ile-Ife, Osun State, was the scene of a brutal attack on Saturday, July 10, 1999, at around 4:30 in the morning. According to reports, 40 Black Axe Fraternity members wearing masks, black T-shirts, and black pants carried out the attack. Even after twenty-five years, the colleagues are still haunted by the memories of the students who died because no one has been found guilty of their deaths. Those who were taken into custody for the offense were released. On July 10, 1999, several students were killed in Blocks 5 and 8 of Awolowo Hall. They included George Akinyemi Iwilade, also known as Afrika, a 21-year-old 400-Level Law student who was also the General Secretary of the Students’ Union Government (SUG), Eviano Ekeimu, a 400-Level Medicine student, Yemi Ajiteru, an extra year student, Babatunde Oke, a 100-Level Philosophy student, and Godfrey Ekpede. The fatal day’s early hours saw the execution of the strike. It was learned that, around 4:15 in the morning, the late George had returned to his room 273, Block 8 in Awolowo Hall following a ceremony at Awo café. Thirty minutes later, George was shot in the forehead by the attackers, who were headed by a student from a different university.  They had first attacked him with a machete, leaving a severe cut on his skull. Following the incident, students took to the streets, taking particular aim at the then-vice chancellor Wole Omole. This led to the ultimate arrest of three individuals, Agricultural Economics Part I student Aisekhaghe Aikhile, Emeka Ojuagu, and Frank Idahosa (Efosa), who were thought to have been involved in the attack. The book Water Must Flow Uphill (Adventures in University Administration) by Prof. Roger Makanjuola provides a description of the events leading up to the slaughter. After the massacre, Makanjuola was appointed vice chairman of the university and actively participated in the investigation and prosecution of university personnel implicated in the killings. In the weeks preceding the killings, Makanjuola  describes an initial event and its fallout: “On Saturday, March 7, 1999, a group of Black Axe members held a meeting in Ife town.” They returned to the campus by car following the meeting. They were passed by some students in another vehicle on the major route, route 1, which leads onto the college. They pursued the students because, for whatever reason, they were furious. When the students realized they were being followed, they hurried to the parking lot outside Angola Hall and fled into the nearby Awolowo Hall for protection. In reaction to the tragedy, the Students’ Union mobilized.  They had also been informed that members…

Details

Construction of the Magnificent Shitta Mosque on Lagos Island.

The famous Shitta-Bey Mosque was built in 1891 with funding provided by the illustrious businessman and philanthropist Mohammed Shitta, often known as “Olowo Pupa,” the first Seriki Musulumi of Lagos. Various sources have estimated that the mosque’s construction cost between £3000 and £7000. Senor Joao Baptista Da Costa, a Brazilian exile in Lagos, designed the mosque with Afro-Brazilian architectural elements with help from native constructor Sanusi Aka. Another design by Senor Da Costa is the Taiwo Olowo Monument in Lagos. On July 4, 1894, the Shitta-Bey Mosque was inaugurated under the direction of Sir Gilbert Carter, the Lagos governor. Oba Oyekan I, Edward Wilmot Blyden, Abdullah Quilliam (who represented Sultan Abdul Hamid Il of the Ottoman Empire), and well-known Lagosian Christians including James Pinson Labulo Davies, John Otunba Payne, and Richard Beale Blaize were among the others there. In a letter sent to the Sultan of Turkey, Quilliam urged the Muslims of Lagos to accept Western education. Mohammed Shitta-Bey sadly passed away exactly one year after the mosque opened.

Details

Events Surounding the Aftermath of the Death of Alaafin Siyanbola Ladigbolu I, Alaafin of 0yo

Natural tradition and customs dictate that Alafin and Eleshin Oba, the king’s horseman, should have been buried next to each other. In 1946, as the ceremony commemorating the Aláafins’ death was about to take place, a British officer went out and arrested  Eleshin Oba, throwing him into jail since, as per British law, attempting suicide is a crime. The son of the Eleshin Oba, who was trading in Ghana at the time and was a native of the Gold Coast, hurried back to bury his father. upon discovering he was still alive. The abomination so appalled him that he instantly took his own life. Pierre Verger first studied and recounted the historical incident in the 1960s. The drama “Death and the King’s Horseman” by Wole Soyinka explored the circumstances surrounding his death.

Details

Historical Development of Ebute Metta in Lagos

One of the well- known locations in Lagos State with a deep historical legacy is Ebute Metta even though a lot of us might not be aware of it. We will reveal the historical evolution of this place in this article. Located in the Lagos Mainland local government district, Ebute Metta is an ancient neighborhood whose houses were primarily constructed utilizing Brazilian architectural style during the colonial era. It is well-known for producing and selling regional clothing and food. Ebute Metta is a component of Otto’s Awori Kingdom. Its capital, Otto, is located on the route to Lagos Island, right before Iddo. In Yoruba, Ebute Metta translates to “The three Harbours.” This is so because the three harbors that make up Ebute Metta’s main structure are Iddo, Otto, and Oyingbo. In the past, these harbors were under the authority of Oba Oloto of Otto, who had his emissaries’ collect taxes from ships carrying cargo to Lagos Island. There was a lot of tension in Abeokuta in 1867 between the followers of the traditional religion and the Christian community, and things were about to go out of hand. It was almost like a sectarian conflict. The native Christian converts in Abeokuta implored the Europeans to take them to Lagos as they were about to be abandoned by some European missionaries, fearing that the traditionalists would wage war against them without the support of their European protectors. After arriving in Lagos, the European missionaries went to the monarch to request that he set aside land for the Egba Christians who had come from Abeokuta. The monarch replied that Lagos Island was already full and that he could not afford to offer the Egba people the little land that was still available. Rather, he recommended that John Hawley Glover, the Colonial Governor, get in touch with his brother Oba, the Oloto, whose lands lay just across the lagoon. When Governor Glover reached out to the Oloto, they consented to grant the Egbas a sizable portion of property extending from Oyingbo (now Coates Street) to a point immediately before the Yaba lands start (Glover Street), where the LSDPC Estate was eventually constructed some 130 years later. Two prominent Egba Christians are Saros and Amaros.…

Details

Shocking Discovery: Queen of Sheba in the Bible was Born in Yemen, Raised and lived in Abyssinia (Now Ethiopia)

Queen of Sheba, known by the Yemeni Arabs as Bilkis, and by the Yorubas as Bilikisu Sungbo Alagawura in the tenth century. The queen, who arrived to see King Solomon after learning of his exceptional wisdom, was portrayed in the Christian Bible as a woman of great strength, intelligence, and insight. She arrived with “a very great caravan of camels, carrying spices, large quantities of gold, and precious stones,” according to the account. Additionally, it was said that “so many spices were brought into Israel never again as those King Solomon received from the Queen of Sheba.” In Islamic tradition, the Arabs, who think she sprang from the Yemeni city of Sheba, also known as  Mareb, call her Bilkis, Bilqis, Balqis, or Balquis. Numerous connections have been found between the Biblical queen and  Bilikisu Sungbo of Ijebu country, according to historical and archaeological research. It is thought that the Queen of Sheba is connected to wealth, eunuchs, and ivory. Ancient West African palaces were known to contain eunuchs, while ivory and gold are known to have been extremely abundant in Nigeria during that period. According to history, the Ethiopian national epic and founding tale, Kebra Nagast, or “Glory of King,” features a significant appearance by The Queen of Sheba. In accordance with this legend, after learning of Solomon’s wisdom, the Queen of Sheba, also known as Makeda, went to his court.…

Details

Discovery of the Popular Ojuelegba Area in Surulere, Lagos

The area that is now known as Ojuelegba was once a forest and the dedicated site for the worship of Ẹ̀shù Elegbua, also known as Légba among the Fon people of the Benin Republic, Exu in Brazil, Echu-Elegua in Cuba, Papa Legba in Haiti, and Papa La Bas to some African Americans, long before civilization existed and the British bombarded Lagos in 1851. The Aworis, who were believed to be the first people to live in this area, worshipped láàlu ogiri ̲kŲ, the deity responsible for maintaining order and the divine defender of natural and divine rules, directly beneath the current Ojuelegba bridge. The shrine has been relocated multiple times before it was finally established at its current location, a short distance (to the south) from the current Ojuelegba roundabout. The stone, which was made of lateritic earth with cowrie shells marking the eyes and mouth of Eshu and into which worshippers poured daily offerings to appease the god, has now made way for urbanization. The inscription “Ojú-Ìbọ Elégba” dates back to the time the town’s name, Ojú-elégba, was formed.  It means “the eyes of Elegba” or the Shrine of Elegba). Ojuelegba gained notoriety for its wild nightlife in the 1970s, in part because of Fela’s shrine, which was first situated in Empire, and also because it serves as a major hub for travelers between the Surulere, Yaba, and Mushin neighborhoods on the mainland. In addition, it connects the constantly crowded Apapa-Wharf shipping yard to the Ikorodu and Agege motor roads.  As a result, it is well-known for its constant gridlock caused by the lack of traffic lights and a traffic warden. In 1975, Fela wrote the well-known song “Confusion” about it.

Details

The Sacred Grove of Osun-Osogbo

This is the Osun-Osogbo Sacred Grove, which is located outside of Osogbo, Osun State, Nigeria, on the banks of the Osun River. More than 400 plant species, some of which are endemic, are found in the Osun Osogbo Sacred Grove in Southern Nigeria. Of these, more than 200 species are recognized for their potential medical benefits. August is when the Grove celebrates the Osun-Osogbo Festival each year. Thousands of Osun worshippers, onlookers, and visitors from all walks of life are drawn to the celebration. One of Africa’s largest unspoiled regions is the Osun-Oshogbo Sacred Grove. There is no hunting, farming, or fishing allowed on the 75 hectares of holy land. The power of Mother Nature in all her splendor is embodied in the sacred forest. This is demonstrated by the uncommon antelope species, monkeys, and other exotic creatures that may be seen wandering around the grove and mingling with the infrequent tourists that come to take in the scenic splendor of the sacred forest as well as the artistic beauty. One of the last remaining holy forests that formerly bordered the boundaries of most Yoruba cities before widespread urbanization is the centuries old Osun-Osogbo Grove. Acknowledging the Sacred Grove’s cultural and global significance, UNESCO inscribed it as a World Heritage Site in 2005. Sacred groves were formerly located close to every Yoruba settlement, but since these have gradually disappeared, Osun-Osogbo has become a crucial hub for Yoruba identity and the Yoruba diaspora. By the time it was added to the 2014 World, the historic setting was still a house of worship and the site of an annual celebration. The historical preface to “Oshogbo” narrates the tale of a hunter who, after turning to the river Osun goddess for assistance, freed his people from starvation and enslavement. The hunter went on to construct a settlement beside the river, which grew into a thriving town.

Details

Origin of the Agidingbi Name in Lagos

Because of the shell fire flowing out of the cannon, the British troops’ use of it against Oba Kosoko during the battle was known as Ogun Ahoyaya, or Boiling Battle. This cannon is still present in front of the Obas Palace at Iga Idunganran, Lagos, along with three more. The sounds produced by this cannon, which was fired upon Lagos in 1851 by British forces, are onomatopoeic and give rise to the name Agidingbi in Lagos. The roar was so powerful that it could be heard all the way to Badagry and the Lagos mainland. As a result, the name was kept, and a portion of Lagos still goes by it today. This is how Agidingbi got its name in Lagos.

Details

Story of Oba Akitoye and his Rivalry with his Nephew, Kosoko

One of Ologunkutere’s sons, Oba Akitoye held a special position in the line of succession. Having held two reigns, he was the father of his second successor and uncle to both his predecessor and first. The Lagos residents with vested interests in the slave trade fiercely resisted him and ultimately overthrew him. The cooperation of those slave dealers with Kosoko, his first successor, resulted in his successful overthrow. His nephew Kosoko was the legitimate heir to the throne. But since Oluwole, the previous monarch, had passed away, he had been living in exile. Akitoye foolishly attempted to reinstate Kosoko in the kingdom after ascending to the throne, defying the counsel of his obedient chiefs, including chief kingmaker Eletu Odibo. This would turn out to be an expensive error. Throughout his rule, Kosoko tormented him, using his devoted followers to fight back until he was forced to escape to Ijebu. Kosoko gave his warriors the order to return Akitoye’s head, but they were unable to kill their monarch and chose to honor him instead. They told Kosoko that he had put them into a trance so that he could pass right through them. By now, the British powers had been gradually establishing colonies in the neighboring nations, so Akitoye turned to them for assistance. In 1851, with their support and more military might, he drove Kosoko from power and took back his kingdom. After that, he and the British government struck a treaty that outlawed the slave trade.

Details

Construction of the Famous Iweka Road by Engineer Iweka Eloebe

One of Nigeria’s first civil engineers, Igwe Israel Eloebo Iweka (Eze Olodo) (1879–1934), constructed the enormous Iweka Road in Onitsha in 1924. Additionally, in 1922, Iweka translated the first Igbo history from the Igbo language into English. In 1932, he was appointed warrant chief of Obosi. In 1939, Isaac Iweka, his eldest son (1911–1996), became the first Igbo to graduate with a degree in civil engineering from Imperial College, London.

Details