Establishment of Christ the King College, in 1933

In Onitsha, Nigeria, Christ the King College, Onitsha (CKC), sometimes referred to as CKC Onitsha or Amaka males, is a Catholic secondary school for males only. In addition to being one of the oldest colleges in the Southeast, it is recognized as the best high school in Nigeria and 36th out of the top 100 finest high schools in Africa. Together with Fredrick Akpali Modebe and his wife Margret, the late Archbishop Charles Heerey, CsSp, founded CKC on February 2, 1933. They also constructed the organization’s initial administrative building and hostels. Up to his passing in the spring of 1967, Heerey continued to be the school’s proprietor. The school’s main goal is to cultivate indigenous talent and leadership abilities among the large number of young Nigerians in a Catholic setting and tradition. Peter Charles Obi Nwagbogu was the first student to be accepted into the college, and Fr. Leo Brolly served as the college’s first principal. A negative impact of the Nigerian Civil War (1967–1970) was felt by CKC. Its infrastructure was mostly destroyed.After the East Central State Government took control of the institution in 1973, it was renamed “Heerey High School” in honor of its founder. But in 1976, the school’s name was restored to “Christ the King College (CKC)” in response to appeals from its former students.  Rev. Fr. Nicholas Tagbo, the school’s first indigenous principal prior to the war, was also reinstated in that year to restructure, renovate, and revitalize the institution. The state administration did, at last, return CKC to the Catholic Mission on January 1, 2009.  

Details

Origin of the Esan Land and their Marital Taboos

Oba Ewuare established laws of mourning in 1460 that forbade cooking, bathing, drumming, dancing, and sexual relations. Many residents found these regulations to be overly burdensome, and as a result, they left the kingdom and relocated to Esanland. In addition to influencing Esanland’s contemporary cultural identity, this migration gave rise to the term “Esan,” which means “refugee.” This notion has received strong backing from oral tradition. Recollections of this movement have been gathered by eminent Esan and Edo historians. Before European settlers arrived, the Esan people were referred to by the title “Esan” for thousands of years. Many historians believe that Bini is the source of the word “Esan” (originally pronounced “E san fia”), which means “they have fled” or “they jumped away” from an uncomfortable system. Because the name of this ethnic group was difficult for colonial Britain to pronounce correctly, the word “Esan” was Anglicized into “Ishan.” Similar corruption is thought to have impacted Esan names like Abhuluimẹn  (now ‘Aburime’),  Uloko (now ‘iroko’ tree), and Ubhẅkhẹ (now ‘obeche’ tree), among others. In the sixteenth century, the Uzea War broke out. The Benin Kingdom and the Uromi Kingdom fought each other in this conflict. The conflict, which raged from 1502 to 1503, was brought on by Onojie Agba of Uromi’s rejection of friendship from Oba Ozolua of Benin. When both leaders were slain at the town of Uzea, the conflict came to an end. But during tranquil periods, like the Idah War of 1515–1516 and the sacking of Akure in 1823, Esan kingdoms would provide men to the Benin Kingdom. Having already taken over the territory of the  Kukuruku people, the Muslim Nupe people repeatedly raided and ravaged northern Esanland during the nineteenth century in an effort to find slaves and converts to Islam. Numerous southern Esan kingdoms participated in the fight to repel the Nupes. The Nupe and Etsako warriors were taken into the Esan cities where their descendants still live, thanks to the victories in the fights that favored the Esans. As the English desired palm products in the nineteenth century, Europe’s influence over Esanland increased. The Benin Empire was sacked by the British in 1897, so freeing the Esans from British domination. The British launched a seven-year invasion of the Esan kingdoms in 1899. Because of its considerable autonomy, Esanland proved to be more difficult…

Details

Ardent Sango Worshippers at Sango festival in Ibadan in 1970’s

The Yoruba people celebrate the Sango Festival every year in honor of Sango, a thunder and fire deity who was a warrior and the third ruler of the Oyo Empire, having succeeded his elder brother Ajaka. Men and women both occasionally dress differently during rituals, and there are more overt gender changes during possession trances. These differences are equally noteworthy. Men and women in Yoruba society are thus afforded institutionalized opportunity inside ceremonial contexts to transcend gender barriers and to express the attributes associated with the other gender, despite the rigorously defined gender roles.” The Sango Festival celebrations date back a millennium, after the famous Yoruba òrìṣà, Sango, left. Sango is recognized as one of the main founders of the former Oyo Empire and its people.

Details

Original Photo of Two Fulani Milkmaids at the Back of 10 Naira Note

Wara are simply delicious Nigerian cheese curds that are prepared locally, primarily with fresh cow milk. It is assumed to have come from the Kwara state city of Wara. It is known by a variety of names in different regions, including Mashanza in Zaire, Woagachi or Wagassirou in the Benin Republic, Paneer in India, and cottage cheese in America. The simplest way to make wara is to curdle milk, which can be either plant- or animal-based (e.g., soy milk or cow or goat milk). Following the curdling process, the solid (proteins and lipids) and liquid (water and whey) parts are separated and squeezed together. This is a sold chunk of curdled milk that has a squeeky texture that is typically eaten on its own, as a complement to different cuisines, or as a snack after it has been fried (this is called Beske). Once cooked, it’s often colorless, unsalted, and white. The short shelf life of the cheese means that it is frequently sold out within a day of production. This image was captured by an English photographer named John Hinde.

Details

Mrs. Tanimowo Ogunlesi, a Women’s Right Activist and Leader of the Women’s Improvement League.

The only female participant at the Nigerian Constitution Conference at Carlton House Terrace is Mrs. Tanimowo Ogunlesi. Date: July 1st, 1953, Ogunlesi, Tanimowo (née Okusanya) Women’s rights advocate Tanimowo Ogunlesi was also the head of the Women’s Improvement League. In July 1953, she was the sole female member of the Nigerian delegation that traveled to the United Kingdom to discuss self-governance. She had started the Children’s Home School in Ibadan in 1949. The National Council of Women Societies was founded in part by her.

Story of Archbishop Benson Idahosa and How He raised the dead during the 1960s

Benson Andrew Idahosa, a charismatic Pentecostal preacher who founded the Church of God Mission International, which has its headquarters in Benin City, Nigeria, was born on September 11, 1938, and passed away on March 12, 1998. Many Christians knew him by his nicknames, PAPA or BA. Being the initial Pentecostal Archbishop in Nigeria, he was well-known for his strong religious beliefs. According to T. L. Osborn, he is the world’s finest African representative of the apostolic Christian faith. Born within a mostly non-Christian community to non-Christian parents, his father, John, rejected him because he was weak and fragile. When he was younger, he experienced frequent fainting spells.  During one of these spells, his father gave his mother Sarah instructions to leave him at a trash pile, assuming he was dead. After several hours, he woke up, started to cry, and needed his mother’s help to be saved. He was raised in a low-income family. His family’s home was made of mud, just like the majority of the homes in the area. Until he was fourteen years old, when he was able to enroll in a local government school, this reality denied him access to an education. He became a Christian as a young man after being converted by a specific Pastor Okpo, and he was among the first people to join his newly formed congregation. He actively preached and won many people over to Christianity. He started doing outreach work from village to village after receiving a revelation from God directing him toward the ministry. Later, he built his church in a Benin City store. In the church was Archbishop Benson Idahosa, a twenty-four-year-old. He was a director of Christ Ambassadors and an evangelist. Jesus said,  “Cast out demons, cleanse the lepers, heal the sick, and raise the dead,” according to his pastor one day. Who claimed, Archbishop Benson Idahosa questioned the pastor? Pastor, Jesus uttered these words. Did you hear, Archbishop Benson Idahosa, that Jesus claimed he could drive out devils, purify lepers, heal the ill, and revive the dead? Pastor: Certainly! Archbishop Benson Idahosa, are you familiar with this? Pastor: Not at all! Can I do it, Archbishop Benson Idahosa?…

Details

Irigwe People: Ancient Practice of Polyandry in the Bantu Tribe of Nigeria

The Irigwe people, who speak Bantu rigwe and are part of the wider Benue-Congo ethnolinguistic group, are an ancient, hospitable and pleasant people who live in the Plateau State’s Bassa and Barakin Ladi Local Government Areas as well as Kaduna State’s Saminaka Local Government Area. The Irigwe are primarily residents of Bassa LGA in Plateau State’s Miango, Jos, and Bukuru village. Anthropologists were well-known for these people’s customary ceremonial dance and polyandry. The Mango Rest House, tall hills, waterfalls, and other tourist attractions abound in the Mango Village. There are around 90,000 or so Irigwe people residing in Nigeria.  Most Irigwes no longer practice polyandry as a result of Christianity and anthropologists labeling the Irigwe tribe as “primitive” and “pagan” civilization for engaging in polyandry, as well as the British government killing many of its indigenous people because they posed a threat to them. Image 1: Irigwe Men, Jos Plateau. 1959. Image 2: Irigwe Women, Jos Plateau. 1959

Details

Establishment of Shell Service Station in Nigeria, 1955.

Shell Service Station, Hughes Avenue, Yaba, Lagos; presently known as Alagomeji in 1955.  In 1938, Shell commenced operations in Nigeria under the name “Shell D’Arcy” after receiving an exploration license. Oil exports began in 1958 when Shell Nigeria identified the Niger Delta’s first commercial oil field in Oloibiri in 1956. Like many other African nations, Nigeria’s economy was heavily dependent on agricultural exports to foreign nations prior to the discovery of oil. Many people in Nigeria believed that the developers were trying to find palm oil.

Meet Haruna Ishola Bello, First Record Label owner in Africa

Born in 1919 in Ijebu, Igbo, Haruna Ishola Bello was one of the most well-known musicians of his era, specializing in the Apala genre. He passed away on July 23, 1983. Beginning his musical career at a young age, Haruna Ishola is recognized as the founder of Apala music in Nigeria. He performed with a variety of instruments, including lamellophone, claves, agogo bells, and akuba. Although Ishola’s 1948 debut album, Late Oba Adeboye (The Orimolusi of Ijebu Igbo), recorded under His Masters Voice (HMV), receives little attention, his constant touring made him the most sought-after performer at parties among the affluent Nigerian elite. Once Oba Adeboye died in an aircraft accident aboard the BOAC-operated Argonaut G-ALHL in 1955, a rerecorded version of his 1948 album was made available. This new release quickly increased his notoriety. About 1955, Haruna Ishola started recording apala songs. She quickly rose to prominence as the genre’s most well-liked performer and was regarded as one of Nigeria’s most esteemed praise singers. Ishola adopted and adhered to a staunch traditionalist stance, incorporating no Western musical instruments into his lineup and quoting Yoruba proverbs and Koranic verses in his compositions. He included shekere into his music before the end of the 1950s, and in 1960 he recorded the song “Punctuality is the Soul of Business” for Decca Records. Decca Records, who also signed Lijadu Sisters, Fela Kuti’s cousins. During her performances, Ishola would be seated with a group of singers, a lamellaphone, shakers, agogo bells, akuba, and claves, as well as two talking drummers.The agidigbo, a hollow lamellophone (thumb piano) that was simultaneously plucked and struck to produce a mesmerizing ostinato at the center of the apala sound, was another essential component of his sound. Ishola founded STAR Records Ltd. in 1969 with the help of jùjú musician I.K. Dairo. Owned by its artists, this was the first record label in Africa. Oroki Social Club, his best-selling album to date, was released on Decca Records in 1971 and sold over five million copies. The album’s lead song paid tribute to Osogbo’s esteemed and well-liked nightclub, where Ishola and his group frequently played sold-out shows that lasted anywhere from four to ten hours. He was among the first musicians from Nigeria to go on international tours, including stops in Benin, the UK, Sweden, France, West Germany, and Italy. Ishola…

Details

Beautiful View of Cathedral of the Holy Cross in Lagos

Where Father Borghero (Francesco Borghero) once served as the church’s parish pastor in 1881. From 1861 to 1865, he led the church and had taken up his cross. The Holy Cross Church was constructed and consecrated. The first nuns arrived in Lagos five years after the Fathers arrived. Although they were probably aware of the difficulties and perils they would face in their future life by the coast, they still had to pray fervently in gratitude when they finally set foot on Lagosian soil and realized that their arduous and miserable journey was finally coming to an end. The four sisters arrived in Lagos in March 1873 after leaving Marseilles aboard a sailing boat with three fathers at the beginning of November 1872.The Bone Ladder by Ellen Thorp.   

Details

Young Atiku Abubakar with His Wife and Friend

An image from the 1970s showing a teenage former vice president Atiku Abubakar in a Lagos nightclub with his first wife Titilayo and a family friend named Sola Atiku recalled how they used to dance to King Sunny Ade’s music in a 2015 interview. In Lagos at the time, you had to know the movements to be hip. Born into a Christian family, Titilayo Abubakar (née Albert) was raised by the Albert family, a Yoruba family from Ilesa, Osun state. She was born and raised in Lagos, completing her elementary schooling in Lafiaji, Lagos, and her secondary education, which lasted until 1969, at St. Mary’s Iwo, Osun state. She wedded Atiku Abubakar, a youthful customs officer, in 1971 before enrolling in Kaduna Polytechnic.

Details

True Story of the Osun Goddess

Osun is the fertility, love, life, and water deity. According to the Ifá oral tradition, Osun is an orisha, a spirit, a deity, a goddess, and one of the incarnations of the Yorùbá Supreme Being.She is among the most adored and well-known Orishas. Osun is a significant river goddess. She is associated with divination and fate. She is the goddess of divinity, femininity, fertility, and beauty. The Osun River and Osun Grove in Osogbo have a rich historical background. The lovely Osun woodland served as the inspiration for what is today the municipality of Osogbo. The founder and his tribe remained blessed by the Osun River Goddess. Osun was King Sango’s queen consort during her lifetime.During that time, King Sango had three wives: Oya, Oba, and Osun. These three wives are currently connected to the rivers “Odo Oba,” “Odo Osun,” and “Odo Oya.” In the state of Osun, Osun, these flow independently without joining. A long time ago, there was a magnificent and strong monarch named Sango. The people of Nupe, the people of his mother, gave him power. He was given thunderbolt stones by his grandfather, which he used to call down thunder. He was dubbed the deity of thunder and fire because of this ability. He spoke with fire whenever he was furious. His mother told him to always appreciate any attractive woman who came his way when he was ready for marriage. The first woman that ever come his way was Oba. She has the same youthful, exuberant dance moves as Sango. They married after falling in love. Following years of infertility, Sango desired a child. His wife gave her consent when he requested if he might find a concubine. He passed a cabin one day on his way from his friend’s residence. He knocked at the scent of the food emanating from the hut. The friendship between him and Osun began when a stunning woman emerged. …

Details

Mamman J. Vatsa’s Widow Gives Detailed Account of his Death by his Longtime Friend, Ibrahim Babangida

“IBB was my husband’s best man at our wedding, and even with all the evidence and their close relationship, I still find it hard to believe he killed his own buddy. Sufiya was cited as saying, “I thought IBB, and my husband were of the same family when we got married.” Both of them were dressed in the same size dress and shoes. In our home, IBB would take off his dirty clothes and put on my husband’s. My spouse looked after Mariam and her kids when IBB left for additional military training. In addition to mounting the horse when IBB married Mariam, General Vatsa reportedly purchased their first set of furniture on hire buy from Leventis, according to Mamman Vatsa’s wife Sufiya. Sufiya’s descent into abject poverty started on December 23, 1985. The family had just wrapped up preparations to go to Calabar because, customarily, they celebrated the Id-el-Fitri in Minna, Niger State, the Id-el Kabir in Kaduna, and the Yuletide in the capital of Cross River State (Sufiya is Efik). Following the essential preparations for the journey, the family bided their time until General Vatsa emerged from the Armed Forces Ruling Council (AFRC) gathering that he had participated in. The excursion was rescheduled for the next day because he arrived home later than expected. Sufiya was watching a movie in her bedroom at around midnight when her husband, who working in his study, came running in to tell her that IBB had sent for him. The wife objected, saying Vatsa should call his boss and reschedule the appointment for the next morning because it was too late in the evening. Lt. Col. U.K. Bello led a group of soldiers to Vatsa’s residence on Rumens Street in Ikoyi, Lagos, during this discussion. The residence was encircled by the soldiers who arrived in military vans and armored cars. Vatsa ordered his upstairs-based wife to peek out the window. She ran downstairs, unable to control her anxiety, and demanded that she follow the soldiers if they took her husband away. Vatsa was to be driven by Sufiya in her Pengeot 404, as demanded by her. Vatsa ordered the kids to…

Details

Unjust Execution of Iwuchukwu Amara Tochi – Part 2

Princewill Akpakpan, a Nigerian lawyer, made the arduous journey to Singapore but was unable to see the young guy who had been found guilty and was forced to return home. Following that, President Olusegun Obasanjo traveled to Singapore. He discussed Nigeria’s possible oil export to the Asian nation during his meeting with the prime minister. There, Obasanjo made reference to Tochi’s scheduled execution and demanded that it be postponed to incarceration. He mentioned Singapore’s excellent ties with Nigeria. “I sincerely implore you to reevaluate the conviction… and to commute the death sentence to imprisonment,” he remarked. With regret, the prime minister said there was nothing he could do to avert the scheduled execution. Tochi’s brother Uzonna received word in the mail a few days prior to the scheduled execution that he and his family would be allowed to stay for an extra three days. Naturally, it didn’t mean anything to them because they couldn’t afford a plane ticket to Singapore. The international community has come to the consensus that the death penalty should only be applied in cases where the accused person’s guilt is established beyond a reasonable doubt and there is no possibility of a different explanation for the circumstances. Singapore is unable to shift the burden of proof and demand that the accused demonstrate beyond a reasonable doubt that he was unaware that he was carrying drugs. The cost of Tochi’s flight to Singapore to see his execution was beyond the means of his parents and siblings. Several activists convened with candles in front of Changi jail on Thursday, January 25, 2007. Among them was Madasamy Ravi, an activist and lawyer who spoke with Tochi when she was incarcerated.

Details

Intense Rift Between Oba Ovonramwen Nogbaisi and Acting Consul James Robert Phillips in 1897

An important annual celebration in Benin is the Igue festival. The beginning of it was some time ago, in 1443. One of the establishments that Oba Ewuare the Great introduced. With this event, one year comes to an end and a new one begins. It’s the Beninese people’s season of thanksgiving. Many rites and customs must be followed throughout the festival in order to prepare the entire Kingdom for the frightful time. People get together to pay their respects to the Oba and express their appreciation to the gods for providing for and preserving them. They give the Oba peace leaves, dance, sing, and carry out ceremonies. Oba Ovonramwen Nogbaisi refused Acting Consul James Robert Phillips’ request to visit in November 1896. Since the visit fell during the holy month of the Igue Festival, which held great significance for both the kingdom and him, he requested a two-month postponement. However, Phillips disregarded the advice and attempted to enter Benin on January 4, 1897. This was interpreted as an affront to the Oba and an invasion. An ambush caught Phillips and his company in Ugbine hamlet, close to Gwato. This incident precipitated the historic Punitive Expedition of February 1897, during which Benin was invaded and numerous priceless, holy, and religious artifacts were taken from the Oba’s Palace. But today, the Oba Akenzua II organizes a number of additional festivals in addition to the Igue festival. This is because he wanted the event to stretch a few days because of the way people are currently traveling and since the Igue festival has evolved into a hub for numerous other Benin celebrations.  

Details

Chief Olu Holloway and Oba of Lagos, HRM Adeyinka Oyekan II’s Relationship in the 1990s

The Adimu Orisa Play was created in 2001 as a tribute to Oba Adeyinka Oyekan, also known as Ekun Oko Lara and Ekun Omo Lara, by the people of Lagos. In addition to being a prominent member of Wesley Cathedral Church, Holloway was the Reformed Ogboni Fraternity’s Olori Oluwo. He was the son of Oba Sir Ladapo Ademola II, the Alake of the Egba Kingdom, and succeeded Justice Adetokunbo Ademola, a Nigerian prince, lawyer, and judge who served as the first indigenous chief justice of the Nigerian Supreme Court (1958–1972).  He was also a cofounder of the Nigerian Law School. He was in that role prior to his death. According to the English Constitution, Holloway is thought to be the second individual to have simultaneously served as the District Grand Master and the Olori Oluwo. Sir Adeyemo Alakija came first. Holloway participated actively in the Freemasons as well. He rose to become their District Grand Master of Nigeria (as defined by the English Constitution), Bobagunwa of Lagos, and Eyo Adimu’s Chairman. Holloway passed away in London in 1996.

Details

Role of Brigadier General Dr. Samuel Ogbemudia in the 1966 Countercoup.

Ogbemudia Samuel, served as the military governor of the Mid-West State (1967–1975), which was subsequently renamed Bendel State and part of which became Edo State. A coup d’état toppled Nigeria’s civilian government in January 1966. In July 1966, Lieutenant Colonel Murtala Mohammed led the so-called Nigerian countercoup, which resulted in the deposal and murder of military ruler Major General Johnson Aguiyi-Ironsi. Yakubu Gowon, the chief of staff of Ironsi, was appointed head of state. Ogbemudia, the 1st Brigade’s Brigade Major in Kaduna, was instrumental in the countercoup by ordering his troops to disarm at the request of Lt-Colonel Alex Madiebo, the artillery commander. Lt Buka Suka Dimka attempted to kill Major Ogbemudia during the countercoup/mutiny, but Major Ogbemudia managed to escape thanks to information provided by Major Abba Kyari and Colonel Hassan Katsina. He was moved to the 4th Area Command in Benin City as the Quarter Master-General in August of that year. Ogbemudia, Major General Ejoor, the Midwestern State’s Military Governor, and Pius Ermobor, the only three officers of the rank of Major and above who did not originate from the Igbo-speaking areas of the Midwest were intelligence officers.  These men occupied positions of strategic leadership. Victor Banjo’s Biafran troops launched a surprise attack on Benin City, the capital of the Midwestern area, on August 9, 1967, with little opposition. The 1944 bombardment was made possible in part by adeal that Biafran commanders and a few senior officers from the 4th Area Command had made.While Ogbemudia briefly went into hiding to organize a resistance movement made up of people upset about the invasion, Ejoor was able to flee to Lagos. Later, he departed for Army Headquarters in Lagos, where he joined the Second Infantry Division under the command of Murtala Mohammed on a counteroffensive into the Midwest.Benin City was taken over by Ogbemudia-led soldiers from Biafran forces on September 20, 1967. After the state was freed from Biafran forces in September 1967, Ogbemudia was named Military Administrator of Mid-West State. On October 26, 1967, Ogbemudia, who had been promoted to Lt. Colonel, was named Military Governor of the state.…

Details