Story of The Fearless King, Oba Tijani Abimbola Oyedokun II of Saki Oyo

There once was a man who inhabited this fragile planet. He arrived, observed, and triumphed. He left a deep influence on individuals of different ages and socioeconomic backgrounds. This man was outstanding; he was renowned for his bravery, valor, and courage. He was none other than Oba (Sheik) Tijani Abimbola Oyedokun II JP, the late Okere of Saki Land. The finest teacher, so the saying goes, is life itself; the more you experience, the more you learn. However, Oba Abimbola was a teacher of everything. His approach was straightforward. He used illustrations and examples to teach. When presented with an ethical conundrum, people of any age or period should consider studying, reasoning, and even reflection. Everyone looks up to him; he is the cornerstone of his town. Everyone knows they can trust him since he always fulfills his commitments. One of his chiefs said, “I have met a lot of clever people, but very few are as intelligent as Oba Abimbola,” to a question. Before you even said anything, he said what you were saying. He could see right through what you were saying,  and if  you  weren’t careful, he could also see right through you. He represented for me what a guy ought to be like in his relationships with  his community, his family, and other people. “I have only known one person who feared no fear,” he said. He was Aremu Ado, and nothing else. There is an old saying that goes, “Records are kept simply to operate as guides to the future, rather than to assist the weakness of the memory.” In 2000, there was an incident at the Oyo State Council of Obas and Chiefs.  At a council meeting,  Oba  Abimbola, who was also Olubadan of Ibadan, Soun of Ogbomoso, Eleruwa of Eruwa, and Aseyin of Iseyin, was present as a  joint vice chairman of the council. Alaafin of Oyo, the council’s permanent chairman, entered the room, and every Oba and chief inattendance stood up in recognition of Iku Baba Yeeye, with the exception of one. It is documented that during his reign in Saki, His Imperial Majesty, Oba Lamidi Adeyemi II, refrained from visiting Saki; the reason for this and his aim were well known. However, because of his understanding of and predisposition for Islam,  he was  called  “a strong headed Oba” who was being swayed or induced. Did you know that even before death called, Oba Abimbola made preparations for dying? A unique and exceptional occurrence among international leaders and rulers. About fifteen years before his death, he gave the order to have a burial dug in a room designated for that purpose inside his  constructed mosque. He took this action to prevent the custom of burying rulers in Saki territory. He really set the pace! Regarding Spiritualism, Sheik Tijani was a leading proponent. He was a spiritual war lord who was highly regarded. “I can remember vividly, every time visitor(s) came visiting at his palace, Baba would discharge them when prayer times were  reached, no matter how important or urgent the meeting was,” said one of his Olori (Queen).…

Details

Events Leading to the Death of Aguiyi Ironsi

As part of a countrywide trip, Aguiyi Ironsi stayed overnight at the Government House in Ibadan on July 29, 1966. Lieutenant Colonel Adekunle Fajuyi, the Military Governor of Western Nigeria, who was hosting him, informed him about a potential army insurrection. Despite Aguiyi-Ironsi’s best efforts, he was unable to get in touch with his Army Chief of Staff, Yakubu Gowon. Early in the morning, soldiers under Theophilus Danjuma’s command encircled the Government House in Ibadan. Aguiyi-Ironsi was detained by Danjuma and interrogated on his purported involvement in the coup that resulted in the assassination of Ahmadu Bello, the Sardauna of Sokoto. The circumstances surrounding Aguiyi-Ironsi’s demise continue to be a contentious issue in Nigeria. Later on, his and Fajuyi’s bodies were found in a forest.  Second Image Info: Head-of-State and Supreme Commander of the Nigerian Armed Forces, Major-General Johnson Thomas Umunakwe Aguiyi-Ironsi (centre) with his Regional Military Governors from left to right; Lieutenant-Colonels, Hassan Usman Katsina (North), Francis Adekunle…

Details

Biography of Maryam Babangida, Former Nigerian First Lady

Maryam was born in 1948 in Asaba, which is now in Delta State. She completed her elementary schooling there. Her parents were Leonard Nwanone Okogwu, an Igbo, from Asaba, and Hajiya Asabe Halima Mohammed, a Hausa from what is now Niger State. Later, she relocated to Kaduna in the north, where she completed her secondary school at Queen Amina’s College Kaduna. At the Federal Training Centre in Kaduna, she obtained her diploma as a secretary. Later, she graduated with a certificate in computer science from the NCR Institute in Lagos and a certification in secretaryship from La Salle Extension University in Chicago, Illinois. Just before turning twenty-one, on September 6, 1969, she wedded Major Ibrahim Badamasi Babangida. Two daughters, Aisha and Halima, and two boys, Mohammed and Aminu, made up their family of four. In 1983, Maryam Babangida assumed the presidency of the Nigerian Army Officers Wives Association (NAOWA) upon her husband’s appointment as Chief of Army Staff. In this capacity, she was proactive in building clinics, schools, training facilities for women, and daycare facilities. She transformed the ceremonial position of First Lady of Nigeria from 1985 to 1993 into an advocate for women’s rural development. In 1987, she established the Better Living Programme for Rural Women, which gave rise to several co-ops, cottage businesses, markets and stores, farms and gardens, women’s centers, and social welfare initiatives. In 1993, the Maryam Babangida National Centre for Women’s Development was founded with the goals of conducting research providing training, and inspiring women to achieve self-emancipation. On December 27, 2009, Maryam, then 61 years old, passed away at a Los Angeles, California hospital due to ovarian cancer. Governors Ifeanyi Okowa and Aminu Waziri Tambuwal dedicated the Maryam Babangida Way in Asaba, the capital of Delta state, on March 19, 2020, thus perpetuating the memory of Maryam Babangida.  

Details

Death of Bola Ige, Another Mystery to be Discovered.

Following the assassination of Chief Bola Ige on December 23, 2001, the press and the judiciary both raised their voices in support of the speedy arrest and prosecution of the assassins. Femi Falana (SAN), a lawyer, said, “Why should Ige, whose precious life was spared by Abacha’s hit squad, have to be killed under a supposed democratic regime of which he was the chief legal officer!”  when he heard the news. What a cruel joke life is! Who, in this democratic day, could have slain Uncle Bola Ige, as he is affectionately known, in his bedroom two days before Christmas? Recall that on October 6, 1995, under the Abacha administration, Chief Alfred Rewane was assassinated.  The distinction is that we currently have a civilian, purportedly democratic system in place, whereas Rewane was slain during a military dictatorship. Rewane held a private position, whilst Ige held the position of top unelected law enforcement official in the civilian government. Rewane was Abacha’s fiercest adversary, but Ige was former president Olusegun Obasanjo’s closest—that is, very close—friend. Just like I’m sure former President Obasanjo took the passing of his close buddy very personally and started crying, people took the death of Ige very personally. Ige was the only cabinet member, aside from Adamu Ciroma, who dared to chastise Obasanjo without raising an eyebrow. As a suitable “farewell” to himself, Chief Bola Ige submitted his letter of resignation from Obasanjo’s cabinet on Wednesday, December 19, 2002, effective from March 31, 2002. This was due to his desire to remain in the country for the Bakassi ruling in February and to take on his new role as UN Law Commission member. Regarding his demise, the federal  government had  committed to taking action. Obasanjo had vowed that justice would be done and the killers would not escape punishment. Who  killed him was the subject of several speculations. According to others, the murder was carried out in retaliation  for the  December 20, 2001, death of Odunayo Olagbaju, a state representative. The name of Otunba Iyiola Omisore, the former deputy governor of Osun State and later senator, is mentioned, suggesting that the remote cause may have been political succession ambitions. Omisore had claimed that in 1998/1999, he had only  consented to be deputy governor if Adebisi Akande, his then-rival for the position, would serve as governor  of Osun State  for a  single term (until 2003). He had brought up the fact that Chief Bola Ige had promised to run for a second term on  behalf of his  friend, Governor Akande. Political and financial divisions between Akande and Omisore start almost  immediately, with Ige,  Akande’s buddy, naturally at their center. Despite years of devoted Awo political clan devotion, Ige’s inclusion in Obasanjo’s cabinet was always perceived as his …

Details

Life and Death of Funmi Martins, Mother of Nollywood Actress, Mide Martins

Images from the 1990s showing the late Funmi Martins, a well-known model and actress from Nigeria’s Nollywood industry. Mide Martins, an actress and producer in Nollywood, is her daughter. Funmi Martins was born in Osun State’s Ilesa in 1963. She lived her entire life in Ibadan and Lagos. Funmi Martins began her modeling career in the early to late 1980s.In the 1993 film Nemesis, she made her acting debut under the guidance of Adebayo Salami. She continued to appear in films after that until her passing in 2002. At the age of 38, Funmi Martins passed away from cardiac arrest on May 6, 2002.

Details

Image of the Luxurious Limousine of Murtala Muhammad Where He was Murdered

General Muhammad left for work on February 13, 1976, traveling down George Street as usual. His Mercedes Benz was moving slowly through the notorious Lagos traffic just after eight in the morning when some troops from an attempted coup led by Dimka appeared from a nearby gas station, ambushed the automobile, and killed Muhammad.  The scene was near the Federal Secretariat in Ikoyi, Lagos. On February 13, 1976, , then 38 years old, and his aide-de-camp, Lieutenant Akintunde Akinsehinwa, perished in their black Mercedes saloon automobile. On the way to his office at Dodan Barracks in Lagos, the vehicle was ambushed. The only weapon that appeared to be protecting him was a handgun that his orderly was carrying, thus it was simple to kill him. General Murtala Mohammed’s bloodstained limousine at Ikoyi, Lagos, after the Nigerian strongman was killed in an unsuccessful coup attempt against his rule.

Details

Nigerian Fashion Pioneer Shade Thomas-Fahm (House of Teflon), Her Story Transitioning from Nursing to Fashion Designing

Some have referred to Folashade “Shade” Thomas-Fahm as one of Africa’s most significant designers and a trailblazer in Nigerian fashion. The renowned designer, who is currently 90 years old, is said to have been the first person with professional training in fashion design and to have owned Nigeria’s first store. The ‘Sisi Sewing Shop’, a local seamstress in Lagos, taught Thomas-Fahm how to sew when she was twelve years old, sparking her interest in fashion. Shade Thomas-Fahm had planned to study nursing in England in 1953, as was customary at the time. She chose to pursue a profession in fashion instead after being enthralled with the West End fashion boutiques upon her arrival in England. She rose to prominence as a result of her important contributions to the Nigerian fashion industry and her commitment to using her imaginative designs to promote Nigerian culture. The creative force behind the upscale clothing line “House of Teflon,” which openly displays the magnificent beauty of Nigerian textiles and the rich legacy of traditional workmanship, is Shade Thomas-Fahm. Her design concept creates unique, fashionable designs that honor the spirit of Nigerian culture by skillfully fusing modern aesthetics with traditional aspects. For her outstanding work in the fashion sector, Shade Thomas-Fahm received considerable recognition both domestically and internationally during the course of her career. She took an active part in a number of fashion shows and events, greatly enhancing the reputation of Nigerian fashion internationally. Born on September 22, 1933, in Bankole Ayorinde Thomas and Elizabeth Olaniwun Thomas’ home, Shade Thomas-Fahm was originally named Victoria Omọ́rọ́níkẹ Àdùkẹ́ Fọlashadé Thomas. However, she was more commonly called “Shadé Thomas” both informally and professionally. Her education was obtained at the Lagos-based St.  Peter’s School,  Faaji, Baptist Girls’ School Araromi, and subsequently New Era Girls’ College.

Details

Miss E. A. Adebonojo, Nigerian Higher Elementary Teacher in the Early 1900s

Miss E.A. Adebonojo, a Nigerian student studying at the University of London, enters a Marlborough Senior Girls School geography classroom in Isleworth in 1946.  During a geography lecture at Marlborough Senior Girls School, Isleworth, Miss E A Adebonojo (from Ijebu-Ode, Yoruba Land, Western Nigeria) points to a map she drew on the whiteboard depicting Yoruba land in Nigeria. Miss Adebonojo has taught at a ladies’ boarding school and completed teacher preparation at the United Missionary College in Ibadan. The Nigerian Teacher’s Higher Elementary Certificate has been won by her. Yoruba was in the early 20th century, when Nigeria’s regional structure was still in place. Yoruba country, a West African  ethnoregion  inside Africa, was first described in writing to the West in the 19th century by travelers who wrote about their travels through the continent, especially by those who visited the region’s boundaries. It was a federation of three regions—northern, western, and eastern—ruled by a constitution that established a parliamentary system of government. Each of the three regions was allowed to maintain a significant amount of self-government under the constitution. There were then regional leaders in every region. Among the leaders are Michael Okpara in Eastern Nigeria (1960–1966), Obafemi Awolowo in Western Nigeria (1959–1960), Samuel Akintola in Western Nigeria (1960–1966), and Ahmadu Bello in Northern Nigeria (1959–1966), and Dennis Osadebay Mid-Western Nigeria 1964 -1966

Details

Wedding Celebration of the Qua People in Calabar

A wedding ceremony among the Qua people of Calabar, a society renowned for its complex customs, unfolds as a stunning and meaningful tapestry. The bride’s female relatives attend this charming event with her, lending a touch of elegance and cohesion to the festivities. It offers an engrossing look at the unity and cultural diversity that characterize the Qua people’s way of existence.

Details

Renowned Yoruba Dramatist, Ladipo Duro, Who Gained Global Recognition at the Commonwealth Arts Festival in 1965

Duro Ladipo (18 December 1926 – 11 March 1978), a Nigerian theater pioneer, was a highly renowned Yoruba dramatist who came from postcolonial Africa. His plays, which he wrote entirely in Yoruba, captured the symbolic spirit of Yoruba mythology and were eventually adapted for the screen, television, and photography. His most well-known production, Ọba kò so (The King did not Hang), is a dramatization of the traditional Yoruba story of how Ṣango became the Orisha of Thunder.  It was praised internationally at the inaugural Commonwealth Arts Festival in 1965 and went on tour throughout Europe, earning comparisons between Ladipọ and Karajan from Berlin critic Ulli Beier. Typically, Ladipo performed in his own plays.

Details

An Image of Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu at 12 Years Old

Along with Nzeogwu, Ojukwu’s half-brother Tom Biggar, a mixed-race man, was also slain. Biggar was Ojukwu’s mother’s child following her divorce from Sir Louis Odumegwu. On July 29, 1967, Ojukwu’s half-brother Lt.Tom Biggar and Major Chukwuma Nzeogwu were murdered in an ambush during the Civil War. “Nzeogwu and my junior brother Tom Biggar both died in the same action side,” Ojukwu later recalled this episode saying I also lost a piece of myself after that death. Image info: Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu with his half-brother and sister, “Tom Biggar (left) and Esther Biggar.”

Details

Sad Story of Iwuchukwu Amara Tochi’s Wrongful Conviction for Drug Trafficking

The tale of 21-year-old football player Iwuchukwu Amara Tochi, who left Nigeria to travel to Senegal, Dubai, and Pakistan in hopes of pursuing a career in the sport in Singapore. His agent gave him instructions to bring what he believed to be herbs to an unidentified football player in Singapore, only to find out later that they were actually drugs. This took place under the Obasanjo administration. The youngster was inspired to travel from Nigeria to Singapore for football trials after receiving optimistic news from a football club. Anti-death penalty campaigners gathered outside Changi jail on January 26, 2007, in the evening, carrying candles and roses, in the hopes that their desperate plea would persuade the Singaporean government to spare the life of 21-year-old Iwuchukwu Amara Tochi. This brief hope was quickly destroyed when it was revealed by Singapore’s Central Narcotic Bureau that Amara had died by hanging following his conviction for drug trafficking—a crime that many people think he did not commit. Worldwide indignation sprang from this. 48 hours prior to the execution, Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong was contacted by the United Nations and the Nigerian government, represented by then President Olusegun Obasanjo, to request leniency, but this request was turned down. Rather, the head of Singapore stated that it was a serious decision. His youth and playing days in football: Tochi had a lifelong desire to play football. It was his passion and a means of getting away from the miserable life he had grown weary of. At the age of five, he was forced to move in with a relative and attend St. Anthony’s Mission School in Ohafia, Abia state. He was born in 1985. However, in order to support their father, his brother left school.…

Details

Throwback to Iconic Jam from Early 2000

  Lagbaja recorded the timeless song “GRA GRA” 24 years ago. How many of us still have memories of this song from 2000? Lagbaja cautions loudmouths who lack evidence to support their conceit to avoid him in “Gra Gra” (2000): He keeps saying, “You better mind yourself (and) no do gra gra for me,” throughout the song. Lágbájá, which means “A person whose name, identity is intentionally concealed in Yoruba,” was Bisade Ologunde’s adopted name. Just in case you forgot, Lagbaja will turn 65 this year. An icon.

Details

Most Sort After Kingsway Store in the 1940s

Patrons and staff at the supplies department of the Kingsway supermarket in Lagos; areas with the labels “Sauces,” “Fats,” “Vegetables,” “Soups,” and “Salt” at about the 1940s.  The first contemporary department store to open in British West Africa was called Kingsway Store. Its headquarters were located in Lagos when it was founded in 1948. The United African Company (UAC) established it in a structure that was formerly occupied by Lagos Stores.

Details

Friends Turned Foes: Story of Dr. Olu Onagoruwa and Gani Fawehinmi Friendship

Gani Fawehinmi “I value friendships. I hope that politics won’t force me to break up with old pals. They were the closest of friends until Abacha tore them apart. Dr. Olu Onagoruwa and Gani Fawehinmi. They had the same tag team vibe. During the Babangida dictatorship, GSM phones were nonexistent. However, the two buddies made it their mission to speak on the land phone at around midnight, talking about the Babangida junta. Later, Gani clarified that he knew their phones were bugged and that the security personnel ought to be aware of the abuses, therefore it was intentional. Olu, as he affectionately called him, was often Gani’s attorney in court each time he was arrested and vice versa. After starting this legal struggle with the government over Dele Giwa’s murder in 1986, Gani included Onagoruwa as one of his executors in his Will. Next came Abacha in November 1993, and Onagoruwa’s offer to become the Federation’s Attorney-General. Gani cautioned him against accepting, saying it was risky for him and that the administration was only seeking credibility by selecting someone of his caliber. Onagoruwa’s Odogbolu kinsman, Lt-General Oladipo Diya, who served as the Chief of Staff during the Abacha administration, convinced him to agree. That was the last time the two lifelong friends would interact. Onagoruwa was taken out of Gani’s Will’s executorship. Their communication had ceased. The gulag still housed Abiola. The abuse of human rights peaked. AGF was unaware of several horrible Decrees that were drafted a few years later. Feeling betrayed and humiliated, he considered leaving the administration, which he eventually did. Based on other allegations, he was taken down. However, the establishment hinted to him inadvertently that he was unable to abandon the ship. Toyin, his lawyer and son, was killed by them. Onagoruwa experienced a stroke and depression.…

Details

Occupy Nigeria Movement, A Protest Against Fuel Subsidy Removal in 2012

A socio-political protest movement known as Occupy Nigeria was launched in Nigeria on Monday, January 2, 2012, in response to President Goodluck Jonathan’s Federal Government’s decision to remove fuel subsidies on Sunday, January 1. There were protests all over the nation, notably in London at the Nigerian High Commission and in the cities of Kano, Surulere, Ojota (which is a part of metropolitan Lagos), Abuja, and Minna. Civic disobedience, civic resistance, strike actions, marches, and online activism were all featured in the protests. Image info: At a workers’ rally in Gani Fawehinmi Partk, Ojota district, Lagos, on January 13, 2012, participants protested against the government of President Goodluck Jonathan’s decision to raise the pump price from 50 Naira to 65 Naira and then 87 Naira.

Details

Detailed History of Nnewi Kingdom in Anambra

The origins of Nnewi may be traced to the fourteenth century, when immigrants from Agbaja, Abatete, Ndoni, Benin, and Ikenga arrived in the region and were quickly assimilated into several lineage groups. The four quarters or territories that make up Nnewi’s organizational system are Otolo, Uruagu, Umudim, and Nnewichi. Every quarter is led by an Obi, the quarter leader, and consists of a sizable descent group made up of smaller lineages. The Sons of Nnewi were formerly known by the names of the four quarters of Nnewi, with Otolo being the oldest and Nnewichi being the youngest. According to Nnewi mythology and oral history, the rabbit, or “ewi,” was crucial in helping the Nnewi founders escape during battles. Nnewi has been known to employ force to protect its borders throughout its history, which is why it is currently illegal to kill or consume ewi there. The term “town” comes from a mixture of “ewi,” which means rabbit, and “nne,” which means mother, so Nnewi is the mother of rabbits. Over the course of its history. In the Anaedo Kingdom, Edo is the Alusi (Igbo: divinity) with the highest rank. The center market, Nkwo  Nnewi, is home to the central shrine of this cohesive Alusi. Nnewi is home to four other deities: Ana, Ezemewi, Eze, and Ele. The high goddess Edo connects three of the quarters in Nnewi together. But as missionaries began to arrive in Nnewi in 1892, the locals progressively turned to Christianity.  Upon its arrival in the town, the C.M.S. church went on to establish schools in Otolo, Nnewi, and Uruagu. One of the nation’s largest markets for spare parts is the central market in Nkwo, which was established in 1901. Its several sections are dominated by the furniture and wood section, the food section, the clothing section, and the spare parts division. From the fifteenth century until 1904, when the kingdom was taken over by British colonial authority, Nnewi was a sovereign state. A progressive shift was marked by the appointment of warrant chiefs, the creation of a royal Nnewi court, and the entrance of British colonial officer Major Moorhouse. A warrant for Nnewi was handed to Igwe Orizu I. An alternative historical version states that the Igbo people arrived in modern-day Eastern Nigeria with three leaders:  two were spiritual gurus, and the youngest was an inherited monarch known as Obi, a king by birthright. The first was the Priest King Eze Nri of Awka, the King Eze Aro of Arochukwu, and the Third was the Political and War King Obi of Nnewi. According to history, the Onitsha people were first travelers to Igbo territory before settling there.…

Details

Alaafin Ajaka Oko “The Second King of Old Oyo Empire “

The Oyo Empire was ruled by Alaafin Ajaka, sometimes referred to as the “Mild” and the “Warlike,” for two separate eras: 1242–1252 and 1275–1285. His tale of change, resiliency, and adaptation illustrates the fluidity of authority and leadership in a bygone period. The fabled founder of Oyo, Oranyan, was the father of Ajaka. He was dubbed “Ajaka the Mild” because of his gentle disposition. After his brother Sango abruptly vanished in 1242, Ajaka took the kingdom. But his soft-spoken style didn’t work well when handling the empire’s ambitious chiefs. Ajaka was driven into exile in the lesser Oyo town of Igboho  as a result of their uprisings.  The composed Prince, when his father moved to Ife, he began to rule as a regent before  Oranyan/Oranmiyan’s death, which led to his coronation. The high chiefs, known as Oyomesi, rebelled against Olowu and the Owu king when they asked Alaafin Ajaka to pay tribute to them, taking advantage of his calm and serene demeanor. The Oyomesi argued that Olowu’s request was against custom because Oranyan, the monarch who inherited the country, was the only one authorized to ask people to honor him, not the other way around. Olowu requested that Ajaka fulfill his request because he was afraid of what might happen if he refused. The Oyomesi invited Sango, his younger brother, who was living in Tapa country at the time with his mother’s kin, to take the lead in the struggle against Olowu’s humiliation. As recompense for his valiant deed against Olowu, the chiefs crowned Sango after he triumphed, though his brief reign lasted only seven years. After Sango passed away, Ajaka was invited to assume the throne. He had completely transformed from the composed monarch to a strong-willed one while he was in exile, and…

Details