ARO META” (THREE WHITE CAP CHIEFS), A Welcoming Symbol in the Ojodu Berger Axis of Lagos

How many of us recall the well-known trio of statues near Ojodu-berger called “ARO META” (THREE WHITE CAP CHIEFS) in Lagos. In Lagos, Nigeria, there is an Art Deco statue called Aro Meta that depicts three white-cap chiefs from Lagos. The three sculptural chiefs, towering over 12 feet tall and designed by Bodun Shodeinde in 1991, were erected to greet visitors to Lagos State. The mascots in this image stand in for the Lagosian royal and chieftaincy families. The Idejos, Ogalades, and Akarigbere are the three white cap chiefs. The Olumegbon (Olori Idejo), Oluwa, Oniru, Ojora, Onilado, and other members of the Idejo, often known as the Landowners, have historically owned Lagos. The native priests of Lagos are known as the Ogalades, and they are led by Obanikoro. Other members of the group include  Onimole, Onisemo, Opeluwa, and others. The first class of Chiefs, known as the “Akarigberes,” is led by a number of people, including Eletu-odibo, Kosoko, Ologun-Agan, Ologun-Atebo, and Ologun-agbeje. It was said that these group of chiefs had followed Adokome, the First Oba of Lagos, when he arrived in Iddo, Lagos, from Benin. We plan to write a series of articles detailing the history of the Lagos State royal house, starting with Oba Adokome (Ado), the first king of Lagos, and ending with Oba Rilwan Akiolu, the current king.

Details

Evolution of Islam in Nigeria

Nigeria was first exposed to Islam in the eleventh century via two different geographic routes: the Senegalese Basin and North Africa. Islam’s beginnings in the nation are connected to its growth throughout the greater West African region. Islam was mostly introduced into Nigeria through trade. Islamic historians and geographers from the Middle Ages, such Al-Bakri, Yaqut al-Hamawi,  and Al-Maqrizi, wrote the first accounts of Islam in Central Sudan.  Later writings by Ibn Battuta and Ibn Khaldun provided additional information about Islam in West Africa. Due to trade between the Kanem kingdom and the Northern African provinces of Fezzan, Egypt, and Cyrenaica in the eleventh century, Islam spread throughout North-East Nigeria, and especially inside the Kanem empire. Northern Muslim traders would occasionally settle in towns along trade routes, where they would subsequently spread Islam to the local populace. When Mai Ume Jilmi of Kanem was converted in the eleventh century by a Muslim teacher whose successors thereafter held the hereditary title of Chief Imam of Kanem, it was the first known conversion of a traditional king. Written works by Imam Ahmad Fartua, who lived during the Idris Alooma period, gave readers a peek of Bornu’s bustling Islamic community. While religious records revealed that, under Mai (king) Idris Alooma’s reign (1571–1603), the majority of the prominent persons in the Borno Empire had converted to Islam, even if a sizable portion of the nation continued to practice traditional religions. By creating mosques, Islamic courts, and a dormitory for Kanuris in Makkah, the Islamic pilgrimage site, Alooma promoted Islam throughout the nation. Islam is said to have entered Hausaland, especially Kano, in the fourteenth century by Muslim traders from the Mali Empire and West African traders who were converted by Tukulor Muslims from the Senegalese basin. In Hausaland, Muhammad Rumfa (1463–1499) was the first king to convert to Islam. Sheik Jamiu Bulala By the 16th century, it had reached the nation’s principal cities in the north before making its way into the countryside and the MiddleBelt uplands. There are, nevertheless, some assertions of an earlier arrival. Sheikh Dr. Abu-Abdullah Abdul-Fattah Adelabu, a  Muslim scholar who was born in Nigeria, has maintained that Islam has spread throughout Sub-Saharan Africa, including Nigeria, during the rule of the Arab conqueror Uqba ibn al Nafia (622–683), whose Islamic conquests under  the Umayyad dynasty, during …

Details

Tinubu Square, Formerly Known as Independence Square in 1970

A famous open space landmark on Broad Street in Lagos Island, Lagos State, Nigeria is called Tinubu Square, formerly known as Independence Square. It bears the name of Madam Efunroye Tinubu, a female aristocrat and merchant. Before officials of the First Nigerian Republic renamed it Independence Square following Nigeria’s independence, it was known as Ita Tinubu. Later, it was renamed Tinubu Square. This image exudes a very pleasant sense of tranquility and quiet.

Details

Funsho Williams Strangled to Death in his Home, at Dolphin Estate, Ikoyi in 2006

The years from the early 2000s until 2007 were among the worst in Nigerian political history. It was a time when, as in the 20th century, evil strolled the streets of Nigeria unchallenged and wined and dined with the political elite. Gani Fawehinmi (SAN), a late human rights attorney, called the period of political assassinations in Nigeria “the darkest and saddest event in Nigerian history.” Fawehinmi stated: “What we have been seeing lately is not democracy on the part of politicians, but rather a thoughtless outburst of insanity by some in the political class, and if checked promptly, the democratic structure will undoubtedly fall, and we will be responsible for the extraordinary bloodshed that ensues. About thirty incidences of assassinations and attempted assassinations were reported in various locations of Nigeria between 1999 and 2006. Ayo Daramola, a candidate for governor of Ekiti State, Alfred Dikibo, the National Vice-Chairman (South-South) of the PDP, Bola Ige, the Attorney General of the Federation and Minister of Justice in office, and Engineer Funsho Williams, who many thought would succeed former Lagos state governor Bola Tinubu, were among the numerous politicians who were brutally killed. Williams received both his elementary and secondary school in Lagos, where he was born on May 9, 1948. He purportedly prevailed in the Alliance for Democracy’s (AD) 1998 governorship primary against Tinubu, but party officials urged him to resign so that Tinubu, who went on to win the governorship in 1999, could run. This is thought to be because Williams was a part of the repressive military regime, while Tinubu was involved in the June 12, 1993, struggle He changed to the PDP to challenge Tinubu, but he complied and let Tinubu run as the AD candidate. Prior to that, he belonged to the United Nigeria Congress Party (UNCP), the ruling political party, which had supported General Sani Abacha, the previous head of state of the armed forces, to run for president in the August 1998 election. However, this election was never held since Abacha passed away in June 1998. Williams, a 2003 PDP candidate for governor when Tinubu sought a second term, was defeated by the incumbent after receiving 725,000 votes to Tinubu’s 910,000. Williams graduated from the University of Lagos with a degree in civil engineering and a second degree from the New Jersey Institute of Technology in the United States. He had served as an engineer in the Lagos Civil Service for seventeen years until his political career called. In 1991, he retired from the Ministry of Works as a Permanent Secretary. In addition to managing his own business, he was a board member of other organizations, including Cappa and D’Alberto Plc, Ajaokuta Steel Company, and Julius Berger. Later, during Olagunsoye  Oyinlola’s  military rule (1993–1996), he would return to Lagos public service to serve as Commissioner for Works. …

Details

General Yakubu Gowon With his Wife and Children

On October 25, 1975, exiled General Yakubu Gowon, his wife Victoria, and their two children, Saratu and Ibrahim (right), were seen on their patio garden in London. General Yakubu Gowon was banished in 1975 following his overthrow by Murtala Mohammed. As a result, Gowon was Nigeria’s head of state for the longest amount of time, holding the position for nearly nine years until Brigadier Murtala Mohammed overthrew him in a coup in 1975.

Details

Ade Bendel’s Story Continued – Part 3

He was charged with two counts of conspiracy and obtaining money with the intention of defrauding Remmy Hendrick Iniqi Cima of Germany of $1,698,380 in June 2003. He was falsely accused of representing the money as payments that were supposed to be made to government officials in exchange for $18 million for a contract. He was arraigned separately on these counts. He was detained in May 2003 and charged with a crime alongside a Chief Olafemi Ayeni (born in Ilesha, Osun State; 43 years old in October 2003), who claimed to be the owner of a multinational corporation named Worldwide that was in control of US dollars. Attia allegedly gave Ade Bendel and Ayeni money to purchase the alleged chemicals when they arrived at his office, only to discover later that there were none and that he had been duped. Ade Bendel and Ayeni claimed they needed the money to buy chemicals to clean the security covers from the notes in the box. While in court, the Egyptian general also showered the EFCC and the court with plaudits for a job well done. Ade Bendel initially entered a not guilty plea, but he then changed it to a guilty plea and promised to reimburse the EFCC for the money. In the end, he was housed in a private cell at Block 2 of the Kirikiri Maximum Prison to serve out his sentence. Ade Bendel maintained constant access to a copy of the Bible while he was incarcerated, claiming to have been visited by a spirit from above and to be a “born-again” Christian. All I can hope for is that the stories of people who were duped will surface once more. Additionally, he was alleged to have operated a tiny “church” inside the jail where he shared the gospel with other prisoners and even turned unexpectedly charitable by feeding them. It is important to note, however, that in 2002, before to his actual arrest, he allegedly told his pals that he was permanently leaving the company because the Holy Spirit had “arrested” him following a church service. After being freed, Ade Bendel organized a number of religious crusades including Nigerian musicians like Dbanj, where he preached in March 2008 to people who were open to hearing his particular style of gospel. On March 24, 2008, at Eleko Beach in Lagos, he held his first major crusade.  He told the story of how he “met” God while incarcerated and spoke about other commonplace things like old people dying away. Some people think that Dbanj has truly turned into a better person and will stand up for the recently appointed angel. Dbanj was rumored to have sobbed during Ade Bendel’s press conference when he recounted what Nigerians call “testimonies.” Some people also said that he should be given another chance at life, but I’m pretty sure that doesn’t include the people who lost their lives—or worse—to his exploits. These people, sadly, will never get another chance. And all right, I’ll take this one in. He announced in March 2008 that the old things had passed away and that he was now a preacher. He declared that bringing more individuals to the Kingdom was the main goal of his life at the moment. In any case, how about giving back a portion of the victims’ money, or just that one? he announced the news and gave his evidence at a press conference at Terra Kulture. It was said that several in attendance, including D’banj, a Nigerian musician, were brought to tears.…

Details

Pericoma Okoye, the Legendary Lion of Africa, Singer, Songwriter and a Traditionalist

Okoye Pericoma “. He was most well-known in Igboland for his musical taste and his fervent devotion to Obeah, the traditional religion of the Igbo people. Under the alias “Arusi Makaja,” he is said to have accomplished a number of exploits that disregarded   the laws of physics. A sizable portion of his community, Arondizuogu, regarded him as a small god. According to certain reports, he hails from the Anambra State community of Ifite Mgbago Umuoji. North Idemili. After winning competitions back-to-back and showcasing his “supernatural powers,” or “sorcery,” as it was commonly called, he was given the moniker “Lion of Africa.” He costarred with Nollywood icon Pete Edochie in the film Lion of Africa. His early life was the subject of the two-part biographical film. Speed Darlington, a singer and internet celebrity, is descended from him. If everyone looks at the very bottom left of the image below, one of his children, young Darlington, is visible. On a devoted day, he was delayed by tax collectors at the then-famous Upper  Iweka on his approach to Onitsha. He disregarded the tax collectors’ demands for his tax receipts when they asked to see them, not knowing who he was. He was picked up by one of the goons, who put him on his shoulders and took him to their office. He didn’t say anything or voice any complaints. He unexpectedly gained so much weight on the journey that the men carrying him tried to set him down, but he was unable to do so. They pleaded with him to come down for several hours, but he refused, saying that the gods had to be appeased before he would come down. He asked for a number of things, one of which was money. After a few hours,…

Details

Dogho Numa, A Traitor to the Benin Kingdom

Following the Itsekiri king’s death in 1848, there was a nearly ninety-year period of interregnum during which the kingdom’s old governmental structure essentially vanished. Dogho Numa (short for Omadoghobone), a well-known member of both the royal and senior commoner “Houses,” was transferred to become the Warri Kingdom’s Paramount Chief following the turmoil surrounding Nana Olomu’s defeat in 1894, a decision that the British government politically supported. Despite being a “Political Agent,” Dogho assisted in opening up the River Niger to British trade and backed the British invasion of Benin in 1897. He served in that capacity until his death in 1932.  The British recognized him as the Paramount Chief of the Warri division in southern Nigeria in 1917. Image Info: Chief Dogho Numa wore ceremonial wear, as did his spouse. She is holding a wide-brimmed hat adorned with her husband’s name, NUMA, and is dressed in a long dress with elaborate jewelry. He bears a staff and is dressed in a long wraparound skirt and a military-style jacket adorned with medals.

Details

Brief Background on Nigerian Playwright and Actor Yemi Ajibade

Yemi Ajibade, sometimes known as Yemi Goodman Ajibade, was a Nigerian playwright, actor, and director who made important contributions to Black theater canon and British theatre after relocating to England in the 1950s. His notable roles as an actor include Danger Man (1964), The Exorcist: The Beginning (2004), and Dirty Pretty Things (2002). Over the course of a half-century career, he directed and wrote a number of popular plays, in addition to appearing in a variety of dramatic roles for radio, television, theater, and film. In 1973, Yemi Ajibade married poet and actress Ebony.

Details

Real Estate in Lagos During the Colonial Era.

“The Legislative Council ordered in 1863 that undeveloped ground behind Broad Street, in the center of the administrative and commercial sector, be sold for £100 per acre; but, between 1865 and 1869, the government sold land in Lagos for an average price of £82 per acre. Ten years later, the average cost of government-sold unoccupied land in Lagos has doubled to £328 per acre. The Lagos Island governor had doubled to £328 per acre by 1886. After two years, the colonial surveyor assessed the value of reclaimed marsh land between Broad Street and the Marina at £490 per acre and assessed the value of good land facing the Marina at £490 per acre. Naturally, land with buildings on it was worth more, especially if they were well-built. A big edifice was located on a tiny, twenty-ninth-acre property at Tinubu Square, which sold for £614 in 1879. Subsequently that year, an acre and a tenth with two dwelling houses—one of which was opulent by local standards—and “a commanding position” on the Marina were sold for £3000. A run-down house situated on three-quarters of an acre on the Marina brought £1,650 in 1882. – The Origin of an African City and Slavery. Kristin Mann’s Lagos, 1760-1900

Details

Ade Bendel’s Story Continued – Part 2

Ade was earning amounts between N5 and N10 million naira from minor runs in addition to these large jackpot wins. As was previously said, Ade Bendel expanded his fraudulent operations outside of Nigeria by diversifying his business and taking his evil trade global. He would offer extremely profitable investment opportunities in Nigeria to gullible but avaricious foreigners. He sent fictitious letters boasting of his “high connections” and his capacity to close any deal in Nigeria, a country rich in oil. Ade is a very cunning scammer. Ade Bendel was the total opposite of other con artists who would rather operate covertly and in the background. He conducted business under wide public scrutiny. He was addicted to fame and adored the paparazzi. He hosted what is currently regarded as one of the largest parties in Nigerian history on December 12, 1999. A celebration fit to turn even the late  Ezego of  Ihiala green with envy. The event was his maternal grandfather’s funeral, and the location was the town of Hiveevie. The moneybag was determined to spend to the very end in order to rock the little town to its core. That burial is still one of the most talked-about in Edo State as I write this. He was only 35 years old, incredibly young, vivacious, and enthusiastic at the moment. With the swagger of a drug lord, he assaulted the town, sure of his limitless cash vaults. We have many prominent artists on the list, including several Juju fuji and Galala reggae musicians. He employed some of the top musicians from that region because he was headquartered in Lagos State. To put it briefly, seven artists were brought into the town, and N5 million naira was allocated for their upkeep. They certainly tossed more than just “bangers,” as they were all ready to light the small town on fire. A large number of Ade Bendel’s followers and friends, many of whom lived in Lagos, invaded Edo State driving some of the “sickest” and “baddest” cars. Many Nigerians experienced both oppression and mesmerization simultaneously. In its entire existence, the hamlet had never experienced such an abrupt infusion of money. However, Ade Bendel’s mother had…

Details

Nigerian Soldiers Invade University of Biafra (UNN) During the Civil War

Federal troops stormed the University of Nigeria Nsukka (UNN) library during the civil war, tearing and burning every book while shouting, “Na these books dem dey read, na why them know too much.” Meaning (After reading these specific books, they have a wealth of information) UNN changed its name to University of Biafra in 1967. As of right now, chemical engineering is not offered at (UNN)

Story of Ade Bendel, Nigeria’s Most Notorious Fraudster- Part 1

Undoubtedly, one of the most well-known con artists in Nigeria is Ade Bendel. He embezzled N500 million from General Abba Kyari, a retired military brigadier general and the former governor of the former North-Central State. Additionally, it is stated that Ade Bendel defrauded well-known Muslim cleric Sheikh Abdul-Jabar Balogun of N70 million and fifteen cars after pledging to assist him in purchasing a ship. In 2003, he robbed Egyptian General Abdel Azim Attia of nearly $500,000, along with numerous other notable persons that we will discuss in this History. This is the tale of the one man whose daring actions in that shadowy world of advance fee frauds and scams rocked—and still kind of rocked—Nigerian society. Let me make it very clear before I go any further: he was not the only person involved in this chaotic trade or other highly contentious industries like drug smuggling. “Judge” Fred Ajudua, Dele Ilori, Oloruntoyin Akindele Ikumoluyi aka Akindele Ile Eru,  Ikechukwu Anajemba aka Rasheed Gomwalk, Amaka “The Queen” Anajemba, Emmanuel Nwude-Odenigwe  (aka Owelle  of  Abanga), Femi Abiodun Lekuti aka Danku Baba Imole, Lanre Shittu, Sanjay Oloruntoyin, Kenneth and Princess Hamabon William were some of the people who completely destroyed the image of the most populous black nation in the world by painting the Blue Planet red with their kleptomaniac tendencies.  Adedeji Alumile, sometimes known as Adedemiluyi Elumalu, was born in Ibadan, Oyo State, in 1966 (some sources date this to 1964), His hometown is Hiveevie, a quaint little village in Edo State’s Owan Local Government Area. He was enrolled in school, but for unclear reasons, he left the primary school and eventually moved to Lagos State in pursuit of a “greener pasture.” Ade Bendel’s acquaintances claimed that when he was younger, he always had the hope of becoming wealthy one day. Ade Bendel’s exact entry point into the fraud world is unclear, but by 1992, he was at the top of the game, hanging out with people like Toyin Igbira, Tulamania, and Eko Round City. Ade Bendel was the undisputed leader by 1994, and he continued to amass wealth even as other con artists and drug lords were gradually going bankrupt. Because of his lucrative endeavors, he became well-known by 1995, drawing the attention of the Sani Abacha administration. The Nigerian Drug Law Enforcement Agency (NDLEA), then headed by General Musa Bamaiyi, would subsequently imprison him multiple times.…

Details

General Aderonke Kale, the First Nigerian Woman to Attain the Rank of Major-General (Two-Star General) in the Army

The first female officer in Nigeria to hold the rank of Major-General (two-star general) in the Army or any of the three branches of the Nigerian Armed Forces—the Navy and Air Force—is General Aderonke Kale. Kale studied in Kuru, the Plateau state’s National Institute for Policy and Strategic Studies (NIPSS SEC12), in 1990. Following her graduation from Kuru, general Ibrahim Badamasi Babangida, the military president, awarded her a colonel’s diploma in 1990. Kale also went back to her job as the commanding officer at the Military Hospital in Benin, Edo state. She was then sent to Lagos State, where she worked as the Nigerian Army Medical Corps’ deputy commandant. Later, she was elevated to the rank of brigadier general, making history as the country’s first female one-star general. The first female brigadier general was Kale. A position that the British Army appointed. On the other hand, she reports to the Chief of Army Staff (COAS) in her capacity as the corps’ commandant regarding the effectiveness and caliber of the nursing, dental, and medical care that Nigerian Army soldiers get. Her induction as the first female Major General in Nigerian history in 1994 set records both in Nigeria and throughout West Africa. She was responsible for managing psychological issues among Nigerian Army members in addition to other administrative and managerial tasks. 1996 saw the general Sani Abacha regime’s retirement. According to reports, Kale retired with honors, and to this day, many Nigerian women, particularly those in the military, look up to her as a guide. She retired with a group of people from her geopolitical zone, and some observers have characterized her retirement as an ethnic purge by Abacha in the context of a purported coup allegedly orchestrated by Lt. General Oladipo Diya of the Yoruba ethnic group. Major General Aderonke Kale died at 84. 

Details

Epic History of the Selfless Queen Iden- A Love Story

The cultural heritage is rich and varied in the arts of human ingenuity. Love, tradition, and duty are what created and destroyed the ancient civilization of history, customs, and traditions. But love, above all, triumphs over duty since love is a duty, a service to humanity. We came upon the ancient Benin Kingdom’s Queen Iden Osemwekha in the joy of genuine love for humanity. Among the noble queens of the ancient kingdom of Benin, Queen Iden stands out for her devotion to and love for the peace and stability of the vast realm, where inhumane traditions were upheld as a means rather than an end in the reign of King Ewuakpe. In contrast to Idia, which is well-known to all except Iden, whose history is rooted in Benin’s peace and stability, the female warriors of Benin are rarely given due recognition. The ancient Benin Kingdom is remembered as a land of warrior kings with tales of powerful adventures and expansion that have persisted in Africa and Nigerian history. The devoted and adored spouse of the illustrious Oba Ewuakpe of the Benin Kingdom was Queen Iden. She was the pride and epitome of African beauty and femininity, as well as love, strength, courage, and brevity. Around 1700 A.D.,  Ewuakpe assumed the throne as Oba (king) in the old Benin kingdom. He was the 26th ruler of the Benin dynasty, an inherited title. Before Ewuakpe became monarch, however, Oba Ewuare had predicted that the Benin Kingdom would go through difficult times at some point, specifically between 1440 and 1473 AD. This occurred under the rule of Oba Ewuakpe. Oba Ewuakpe now weds Iden, a stunning woman, following his coronation. She shared a home with him in the royal palace, which was constructed without water using red soil mixed with palm oil. Early in  Ewuakpe’s reign, he suffered so many setbacks that every subject in the kingdom rose up in rebellion against him. The primary motivation behind the uprising was opposition to the monarch’s haughtiness and egregious disregard for human life.  This culminated in the mass execution of his subjects at Uselu, at his mother Queen Ewebonoza’s funeral, in or around 1715 A.D. The Kingdom’s elders and populace were forced to cut off ties with the King when it became clear that they could no longer put up with his excesses. As a result, they called off all of the palace meetings. Additionally, social services were grounded. The royal slaves (ovien), all of his wives (Olois), and other palace attendants were also impacted by this insurrection and left! Queen Iden’s decision to stay with her husband showed her love and dedication to him, saving the Oba from being abandoned. Over time, Oba Ewuakpe found life at the palace intolerable and made the decision to relocate to Ikoka, the town of his mother. He wasn’t treated well there, though. He didn’t get a warm welcome when he got there.…

Details

Persecution of Dr. Beko Ransome-Kuti During the Babangida Administration

The military administration of General Ibrahim Babangida charged Dr. Beko Ransome Kuti, Mr. Femi Falana, and Chief Gani Fawehinmi with treason on June 15, 1992, at Gwagwalada Chief Magistrates’ court in Abuja. In relation to the public demonstration against the regime’s anti-democratic agenda and structural adjustment program, he and other protestors were taken into custody. Assuming Beko and other others were aware of Babangida’s hidden plans. Babangida threw out Chief MKO Abiola’s most equitable and free election in the country in June 1993. The population was inspired to rebel against the military by Beko’s CD. He was a co-founder and chairman of Campaign for Democracy, which was founded as a result of the lesson learned from this. Beko was detained once more in 1995 on suspicion of treason after being a conspiratorial accomplice to the alleged coup against General Sani Abacha. Along with other journalists like Kunle Ajibade, Senator Chris Anyanwu, George Mbah, and Ben Charles Obi, he was sentenced to life in prison. Beko and other prisoners were let free following Abacha’s 1998 death. His crime at the time was aiding in the distribution of a statement made by a soldier who had been detained in connection with the plot. Lung cancer claimed Beko’s life in 2006.

Details

Oba Gbadebo I, the Alake of Egba, the first Monarch in Nigeria to Visit England

Oba Gbadebo I, the Alake of Egba, was the first Nigerian monarch to travel to England in May of 1904. King Edward VII had invited the State to make the visit. He had been there by sea for twenty days. During his visit, he prayed at Westminster Abbey and stayed at Buckingham Palace. A massive Holy Bible that is currently housed in the Palace of the Alake of Egbaland was a gift from the King to him. His parents are Yoruba, and he was born in Freetown. He began his career as a printer before moving into the importing and trading of goods, eventually rising to become one of the richest men in West Africa. He has also published newspapers at different points in time. Gold Coast Colony Advertiser, The Lagos Times, and The Lagos Weekly Times were among his publications. Charlotte Obasa,  a well-known philanthropist and advocate for women’s rights, had a father named Blaze. In addition, Obasa owned Lagos’s first private motor transport business. Photo Info: Standing in the middle, the Alake of Abeokuta (as it was called then) in his state/royal robles and crown, beside him on the right is Sir…

Details

Palace Coup of 1985 Led by General Babangida

General Babangida, who was the Chief of Army Staff at the time of the 1983 coup, began plotting to remove General Muhammadu Buhari, the military head of state. A level of military skill never before seen in coup plotting history was used to plan the palace coup of 1985. As ringleader, Babangida planned the entire operation from the top down, developing strategic relationships with allies such as Sani Abacha, Aliyu Gusau, Halilu Akilu, Mamman Vatsa, Gado Nasko, and younger officers he taught at the military academy (graduates of the NDA’s Regular Course 3). Gradually, he moved his allies up the military hierarchy. Due to General Tunde Idiagbon, the brutal second-in-command to General Muhammadu Buhari and the sixth chief of staff at Supreme Headquarters, the palace coup’s execution was first delayed. Four Majors—Sambo Dasuki, Abubakar  Dangiwa Umar, Lawan Gwadabe, and Abdulmumini Aminu—were assigned to arrest the head of state when the scheme changed at midnight on August 27, 1985. By daylight, the conspirators had assumed control of the government, and Babangida had flown into Lagos from Minna, where General Sani Abacha had declared him the new head of state during a radio broadcast. In a speech, Babangida defended the coup by calling the military rule of General Muhammadu Buhari “too rigid.” Muhammadu Buhari was kept under house imprisonment in Benin until 1988 by Babangida, who established by decree his formal position as the President and Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces of the Federal Republic of Nigeria. He also reorganized the national security apparatus, assigning General Aliyu Gusau the position of Coordinator of National Security, who directly reports to him in the president’s office. He established the State Security Service (SSS), the National Intelligence Agency (NIA), and the Defence Intelligence Agency (DIA). He also established the Armed Forces Ruling Council (AFRC), the highest law-making council, and he serves as its chairman.

Details