Controversies Surrounding Ojukwu’s Marriage to Bianca

The early 1990s saw the contentious relationship become a national topic of conversation. Back then, a specific newspaper published a fake story claiming she was expecting. The pair did not acknowledge or deny the affair but Silverbird Productions, the company that organized the pageant, was incensed since MBGN title holders aren’t allowed to have romantic relationships in public while they’re in power. All this caused her to abdicate her throne, even if at the time she refuted or denied having an affair with Ojukwu. Regina Askia, the first runner-up, took over and ended Bianca’s reign as Nigeria’s Most Beautiful Girl. The romantic relationship was complicated by the fact that Bianca’s father, Christian Chukuwuma Onoh, popularly referred to as “CC Onoh,” was Dim Ojukwu’s political supporter. Former Anambra State Governor CC Onoh was adamantly against his daughter’s relationship with the Ikemba Nnewi. But the teenage beauty queen’s first goal at the moment was finishing her legal studies at the University of Nigeria, Nsukka. On November 12, 1994, at a grand wedding hosted in Abuja, she finally earned her law degree and wed the warlord. It’s also critical to remember that Ojukwu was single at the time hence they most likely were able to pass through a stringent Roman Catholic system wedding.  They decided to have a Christian wedding ceremony instead of the customary one because her parents disapproved of the coupling. Years later, after he accepted the truth of their love for one another, the pair finally won her father’s support.CC Onoh demanded an extremely unachievable bridal price of 100 pre-independence copper coins when he agreed to the payment of his daughter’s bride price. When the conventional marriage ceremony took place in 2001, the couple had already welcomed three children into their union. After a brief illness, Ikemba Odumegwu Ojukwu passed away in the United Kingdom, ending their seventeen-year marriage. As of November 26, 2011, he was 78 years old.    

Details

Funmilayo Ransome-Kuti: A Woman of Bravery and Great Valour

During the tax protest against the British, Funmilayo Ransome-Kuti is reported to have retorted, “You may have been born, but you were not bred! “, in response to a British district officer’s yell “Would you use such language with your mother?” She was referred to as the “Lioness of Lisabi” by the West African Pilot. Fumilayo Ransome Kuti was the first female student to attend the Abeokuta Grammar School. She was born in Abeokuta, which is now part of OGUN state. In her early adult years, she was a teacher in the United States, setting up some of the first preschool programs as well as literacy programs for low-income women. Ransome-Kuti founded the Abeokuta Women’s Union in the 1940s and fought for women’s rights, calling for more representation of women in local government and an end to unjust taxation on market women. Known by the media as the “Lioness of Lisabi,” she organized rallies and marches with up to 10,000 women, compelling the Alake family, who had been in power, to temporarily abdicate in 1949. Ransome-Kuti participated in the Nigerian independence movement as her political stature increased. She went to conventions and accompanied delegations from abroad to talk about draft national constitutions. She led the charge in founding the Federation of Nigerian Women’s Societies and the Nigerian Women’s Union, promoted women’s voting rights in Nigeria, and rose to prominence in the global peace and women’s rights movements. For her efforts, Ransome-Kuti was granted membership in the Order of the Niger and the Lenin Peace Prize. She later backed her sons’ criticism of the military regimes in Nigeria. After suffering injuries in a military raid on her family’s land, she passed away at the age of 77. The musician Fela Kuti (born Olufela Ransome-Kuti), the activist and physician Beko Ransome-Kuti, and the health minister  Olikoye Ransome-Kuti were among Ransome-Kuti’s offspring. Frances Abigail Olufunmilayo is her full name. On October 25, 1900, Olufela Folorunso Thomas was born in what was then a part of the British Empire’s Protectorate of Southern Nigeria. She was born to Lucretia Phyllis Omoyeni Adeosolu (1874–1956) and Chief Daniel  Olumeyuwa  Thomas (1869–1954), who belonged to the elite Jibolu-Taiwo dynasty. Her mother was a dressmaker, and her father cultivated and sold palm products. Ebenezer Sobowale Thomas, the father of Frances, was born in Freetown, Sierra Leone; Abigail Fakemi was born in the Yoruba town of Ilesa. Sarah Taiwo, the paternal great-grandmother of Ebenezer Sobowale Thomas, was a Yoruba lady who was abducted by slave merchants in the early 1800s and later returned to her family in Abeokuta. She is the earliest known paternal ancestor of Frances.…

Details

Rewarding Loyalty: Babangida Speaks on Endorsing Abacha

Babangida was quoted, “Where do I go from here? They don’t think I’m trustworthy. I wouldn’t be here today without Sani (Abacha), and I wouldn’t have been an officer in the Nigerian Army or the President of Nigeria today without the North. I don’t want to come across as ungrateful to Sani; despite his seeming lack of intelligence, he is skilled at toppling administrations and foiling coup attempts. He oversaw my entry into office in 1985 and safeguarded me during the numerous coups I encountered in the past, most notably the Orkar coup in 1990, which allowed him to save my family, including my young daughter. “I won’t force Chief Abiola on him if he says he doesn’t want him; Sani risked his life to get me into office in 1983 and 1985.” Source: The June 12 Tale.  

Details

Former Vice President Atiku Abubakar in his Vibrant Twenties

 Young Atiku Abubakar before beginning work with the Nigeria Customs Service in the early 1970s. After twenty years of service, Atiku Abubakar became the Deputy Director, the Nigeria Customs Service’s second-highest rank at the time. After retiring in April 1989, he focused entirely on business and politics. In his early years as a Customs Officer, he began his career in real estate.

Details

Ever Heard of the First Three-Storey building in Lagos Owned by Andrew W.U. Thomas; Read Below

It was constructed in the Afro-Brazilian architectural style and was Lagos’s first three-story structure. The renowned nationalist and civil engineer Herbert Macaulay oversaw the construction. It was a massive building with 40 rooms, a rose garden, and a cupola. Numerous dignitaries visiting Lagos were accommodated there. This opulent home of affluent Oyo Prince and auctioneer Andrew W.U. Thomas (1865–1924), father of well-known lawyer and politician Bode Thomas, was tragically destroyed by fire in the early 1980s.

Details

Oba Adeyeye Enitan Ogunwusi (Ọjájá II) Responding to the Clarion Call

A photo taken in the late 1990s while Oba Adeyeye Enitan Ogunwusi (Ọjájá II) was still a youth corps member. The 51st and current Ooni of Ife is Oba Ogunwusi. He is a graduate of Igbinedion University in Edo State, the University of Nigeria, Nsukka, which is situated in Enugu State, and the Polytechnic of Ibadan.

Details

Oba Olateru Olagbegi lI, the Great Olowo of Owo, Owo

The largest royal palace in Africa, Aghofen Ologho, is home to the Olowo of Owo. It is said to have around a thousand chambers spread across 180 acres, and the Nigerian government designated it as a national monument in 2000. It has been stated that Olowo Irengenge constructed the palace circa 1314. One Yorubaland village that is well-known for the age of its terracotta statues is Owo. Despite being founded by immigrants from lle Ife, the town has many Benin-inspired customs. The chiefs’ and oba’s regalia, as well as the ceremonies, are quite similar to those in Benin. Owo, which was situated between Ife and Benin, showcased the creative customs of both nations. In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, it was even said that Benin’s obas had invited Owo artists to create ivory statues. We’ll talk about the history of Ondo’s ties with Benin Kingdom at a later time.

Details

Can a Man Truly Die Twice, Read About Gbenga Adeboye and Comment Your Thoughts

Even after his passing, Gbenga Adeboye is without a doubt the most well-known and respected radio host in Yoruba territory. On September 30, 1959, the legend was born in Ode Omu, Gbongan, Osun State, Nigeria, into a Christian family. He described in several of the narratives that make up his autobiography how he was knowledgeable about both Islam and  Traditional religions. And his records clearly show this. In his self-description, he said that he was a man  who decided to  integrate Islam, Christianity, and Traditional beliefs in order to receive particular honor in heaven. He was a man who accurately and precisely quoted passages from the Bible, the Al-Qur’an, and the Oracle,  so no explanation  was necessary. Despite the fact that he was born by a general  supervisor of a church,  it was said that  these quotes gave him  the 3-1 moniker Alhaji, Pastor, Oluwo. The late Adeboye began his career in radio as a freelance  presenter for Radio  Lagos.  There, he hosted the popular show “Funwontan,” which became a favorite of his Yoruba listeners in 1981. “Give it all to them,” or “Funwontan,” was later renamed “Gbenga Adeboye in the Mix” on Lagos State’s Radio Lagos and  “Gbenga Adeboye in the House” on Ogun State Broadcasting Organization’s OGBC. He recorded over nine albums and distributed them on tape while he was working tirelessly on these radio shows. These  albums included Ph.D. Beetle, Orosunkunnu 1 & 2, Funwontan 1 & 2, linle Or Láti Ori Ité Mimo 1 & 2, Versatility, London Yabis, Aiyetoto, Supremacy, and Controversy. There were too many names for him. Despite being born Elijah “Nurudeen”  Oluwagbemiga Adeboye, he went by so many names that it was hard to remember them all.His achievements in humor and music led to the names. Funwontan, Alhaji Pastor Oluwo, Abefe, Jengbetiele, Alaye mi Gbengulo, One Man Battalion, Arole-Abija of his Area, etc. are a few names among them. Gbenga’s life is comparatively full of adjectives; occasionally, one wonders how one could possibly fit them all in a lifetime. Not only was he a comic, humanitarian, activist, orator, master of ceremonies, prophet, humorist, and entertainer; in actuality,  he was also the father of stand-up comedy in Nigeria. Through all of his creations, jokes, and radio shows,  he used his gifts to  spread the gospel of democracy and humanity throughout Nigeria. He was a living, breathing library of government,  including  its history, activities, laws, policies, and both positive and negative aspects. The moniker “Mr. Funwontan,” which he acquired from the aforementioned program, rose to fame prior to the rise of the comedy industry. Speaking in the voices of his fictional characters—the most well-known of whom are  itù Bàbá ita and  Láisí  Abesupinle —Gbenga was able to speak in the voices of up to eleven distinct persons! In his 28-minute recording titled  “ifé and Modakeke,” he traced history, pinpointed causes, and presented “solutions” to the ifé/Modakeke dispute. Later on, this mediation was also referred to as “Pa ogún, pa ôtè of Yorúbá” (great mediator of Yorúbá). He also brought up the  Offa/Erín-Ilé property dispute from 2001.…

Details

President Yar’Adua Declares Asset, sets Commendable Standard for Other Politicians

Being the first Nigerian president to do so, Yar’Adua made public his May asset declaration on June 28, 2007. It said that he had ₦856,452,892 (US$5.8 million) in assets, of which ₦19 million ($0.1 million) belonged to his wife. In addition, he possessed liabilities of ₦88,793,269.77 ($0.5 million). His pre-election pledge was accomplished with this revelation, which aimed to deter corruption and serve as an example for other Nigerian leaders.

Details

Gruesome Murder of Prophet Eddie Nawgu by the Bakassi Boys

If you truly love history, you probably know about the confrontation between Prophet Eddie Nawgu and the Bakassi Boys. Eddie Nawgu, whose real name was Edwin Okeke, was a self-described prophet, sorcerer, and religious leader from Nigeria. Among Igbo people, he was most known as Eddie Nawgu in the mid-1990s. Because he was from the Nawgu village,  a town in the  Dunukofia L.G.A. of Anambra State, Nigeria, he went by the moniker “Nawgu.” Eddie “Nawgu” Okeke, 29, declared at the age of 29 that he had been touched by the Biblical God and was endowed with the  capacity to “see” and “perceive” things that the human eye and other four senses were unable to detect. He constructed a building like a church and called it the “Anioma Healing Centre” not long after he started his ministry. He claimed  that  the “Anioma Healing Center” was founded with the intention of healing the sick and  giving people  hope again,  but that wasn’t  really the case. A few years later, rumors about his illegal actions began to circulate. For example, during a 1990 session,  believers were instructed  to bless two guys for whom  the prophet had earlier prayed for a breakthrough (it turned out that the pair  had  successfully smuggled hard drugs into Europe without being detected). The self-described prophet of God was  now being  investigated for multiple crimes that had been committed in the state of Anambra as well as in the community. This caused him to come to the notice of the Bakassi boys, a vigilante security group led by the former Anambra State  governor,  Chinwoke Mbadinuju. Their mission was to find and apprehend criminals, sponsors of criminal gangs, and dubious-looking men. Eddie Nawgu was accused of kidnapping, supporting notorious criminals, engaging in rituals involving the use of human body parts—such as the skull—illegally possessing firearms, and sacrificing human beings. He shot to the top  of their “most  wanted list” as  a result. They flipped the entire space around. The others were observing the child as he performed. When they inquired  about the location  of my husband’s gun, I answered, “Which guns?” They requested pump-action and handguns, but there was only one double-barrel gun available. I informed them that we lacked any. Saying, “I will cut off your head if you don’t give us those guns,” one of them raised his machete. Nothing was discovered by them. “Turn your back, or I’ll chop off your head,” he yelled. He hurled his machete in my direction, raised it, then dropped it. They assured…

Details

Fela’s Uncanny Relationship with his Spiritual Advisor, Professor Hindu

Professor Hindu, whose real name is Kwaku Addai, was a close spiritual companion and magician of the late Afrobeat musician Fela Kuti. He says he was seven years old when he realized he had a gift. He studied tailoring after graduating from high school. He abandoned it, nonetheless, in favor of the more lucrative profession as a magician. Fela renamed his Afrika 70 band as Egypt 80 in the same year. According to reports, while on assignment at Fela’s New Afrika Shrine, Professor Hindu “reportedly hacked open one man’s throat and fatally shot another.” The two were purportedly brought back to life. After his mother passed away in 1981, Fela Kuti brought Professor Hindu to Lagos, where he thereafter served as Fela’s spiritual adviser. Professor Hindu is notorious for being a magician who killed two individuals in Ikeja and then brought them back to life a few days later. He was Fela’s spiritual advisor, and they had a tight relationship. But Fela’s intimacy frequently got him into problems. Fela was incarcerated for five years after following Professor Hindu’s advice; he had promised that airport security would not discover foreign currency in his pocket, but they did. Fela is accused of participating in an armed robbery in Ikeja, Lagos, in December. Before the ridiculous accusation is dropped Fela is physically assaulted by the cops, he was beaten so badly that, years later, he claims that this was the only time he truly feared for his life out of all the times he had been battered. I can’t stop questioning myself if Fela’s descent into this new spiritual experience was brought on by the death of his mother. His mother was his inspiration, defender, soul mate, and source of motivation—in other words, she was everything. He was also known by the nickname “Omo lya Aje,” which translates to “son of a witch.” This is in reference to Fela’s daring and bravery in taking on the establishment and, each time, emerging from the ensuing tragic spectacles unscathed.…

Details

Children in 1950 Marvel at the Lagos Edifice During a Government Sponsored Exhibition

An image of Tinubu Square, Lagos, and surrounding buildings with kids touring a government-sponsored show. The Supreme Court, which was destroyed in 1960, is the notable structure flying the Union Jack in the middle. The Methodist Church is the building with the clock tower in the upper right corner; it was eventually replaced by a new one. Date: Probably in the 1950s.

Details

Iconic Military Photo of Major Muhammadu Buhari, Colonel David Bamigboye, and Lt. Colonel Olusegun Obasanjo During the Biafran War

Col. David Bamigboye belongs to the ethnic group known as the Igbomina. Theophilus Bamigboye, a former military leader who is now a politician, is his younger brother. In addition, he served as Kwara State’s first military governor. His department, which dealt with scholarship and bursary concerns, was established as part of the Kwara State Ministry of Education in 1968.He declared in 1971 that the Kwara State Polytechnic will be established, and it did so in 1972.He inaugurated the new Ola-Olu Hospital location in December 1972, which has 35 beds. His Ilorin holdings were taken in 1977, and they weren’t recovered until May 2003, 26 years later. Femi David Bamigboye, his son, was named the governor of Kwara State’s special assistant in 2009. In 1967, Col. D.L. Bagiboye became the first Military Governor to be posted to Kwara State. During his tenure, the state’s highly skilled, seasoned, and patriotic civil personnel were effectively utilized by his administration.Among the many accomplishments he and the State Executive Council members noted was the construction of secretariats to accommodate civil servants’ office accommodations in the state capital. Col. David Bamigboye, 77, passed away on September 21, 2018. Image Info: Iconic military photo of Major Muhammadu Buhari (far left), Colonel David Bamigboye in the middle , Lt. Colonel Olusegun Obasanjo far behind and Colonel Emmanuel Olumuyiwa Abisoye during the Nigerian civil war.

Details

Olusegun Obasanjo at 21

Older picture: 21 years old in 1958, Olusegun Obasanjo Aremu joined the Nigerian Army. He had his training at Aldershot and was commissioned in the Nigerian Army as an officer. Additionally, he received training in India at the Indian Army School of Engineering and the Defense Services Staff College,  Wellington.

Details

The Mythical Belief of the Westerners to the Esu Deity

In the 1979 film “Aiye,” Chief Hubert Ogunde played “Osetura,” seeking advice from the “Ifa” oracle. He was told to conduct the “Iroko Oluwere festival” during this consultation after learning that the witches were causing the people’ problems for the first time. This image is a still from the 1979 filming of the movie, which took place in the village of “Ibatefin” close to the town of Idi-Iroko, which is on Nigeria’s border with the Benin Republic. The link between Esu and humanity is described in “Ose’tura.” To be more precise, Esu manifests in several ways. In this particular verse (Ose’tura), the manifestation is referred to as Esu  O’dara, which means the Divine Messenger distributes or starts transformation. When the Westerners arrived in the 17th century, they called EŚU the devil. However, EŚU is a divine messenger and a Deity, never the devil or evil.

Details

A Picture of Beautiful and Strong Women That Should Be Remembered

Pretty Women: Nigerian First Lady Fati Lami Abubakar (R), the wife of Abdusalam Abubakar, the Nigeria’s military head of state from 1998 to 1999, is pictured at the Africa First Ladies Peace Mission Forum opening in Abuja on May 10, 1999, flanked by other African First Ladies, Nana Konada Agyemman-Rawlings (Ghana), Kuvamba Nujoma (Namibia), and Stella Obasanjo, the wife of the country’s incoming president, Olusegun Obasanjo. General Abdulsalami Abubakar’s wife, Fati Lami, stated that maintaining peace and stability was “too important” to be left up to government alone.

Details

Details of the Activities of Notorious Kidnapper, Evans, Affiliated Gangs and Eventual Arrest

Evans is a Nigerian kidnapper from Nnewi in Anambra State’s Nnewi North Local Government Area who was found guilty. He became well-known in 2017 after he abducted Donatus Dunu,  the managing director of Maydon Pharmaceuticals Ltd, and demanded 223,000 euros in ransom from his relatives. Little is known about the kidnapper’s early years; however, he had stated that he entered the profession when his father disowned him. Chukwudi Dumeme Onuamadike was his birth name. His mother was never supportive even though she knew he was a kidnapper. Evans refused to listen to her repeated warnings to halt what he was doing. He originally began his kidnapping operation in Anambra. He started under the tenure of former Governor Peter Obi, but the heat forced him to move to Edo State. He relocated from Edo State to Lagos in 2013, where he rose to prominence as one of the leading kidnapping masterminds, controlling up to seven groups, making it difficult for the police to apprehend him. He would kidnap his victims and transport them to a leased flat in Igando with the assistance of his group. The victims would be held captive in House No. 21 Prophet  Asaye Close, New Igando, until their loved ones paid the ransom. In an interview with Vanguard, Evans revealed that he was compelled to leave Junior Secondary School Class 2 after his father, Steven Onwamadike, divorced his mother, Chinwe, and weded someone else. Evans, a resident of Akamili, Umudim Quarters, Nnewi, Anambra state, clarified that he was urged to join another businessman in Nnewi who trades in spare parts by his father, a businessman. Sadly, things didn’t work out for Evans after he had been working for his master for five years.  He was charged with stealing and was taken away without receiving payment. He claims that his father kicked him out of the house because he was so ashamed by this turn of events. Evans claimed that the behavior of his father had a profound effect on him and that he felt compelled to move into his mother’s home. He claimed that in addition to accepting him, his mother had arranged money for him to come to Lagos. Evans claimed that when he was in Lagos, he began selling diesel to truckers and luxury bus drivers at the Alafia Bus Stop on the Lagos-Badagry Expressway. He slept at a bus garage while selling diesel, and it was there that he became a member of a heist group. His initial band…

Details